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    University of Florida
   
 
  Feb 01, 2015
 
 
    
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2011-2012 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG/PREVIOUS EDITION]

Graduate Degrees


The information in this catalog is current as of July 2011. Please contact individual programs for any additional information or changes.

Definitions
Listing of Degrees and Programs
Requirements for Master’s Degrees
General Regulations for Master’s Degrees
Master of Arts and Master of Science
Other Master’s Degrees
Requirements for Doctoral Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Nursing Practice
Doctor of Plant Medicine
Specialized Graduate Degrees
Engineer
Specialist in Education
Nontraditional Programs
Concurrent Graduate Programs
Joint Degree Programs
State University System Programs
Interdisciplinary Graduate Concentrations and Certificates

Definitions

Degree is the title conferred by the University on completing the academic program, for example, Doctor of Philosophy. Some degrees include the name of the field of study (Master of Architecture, Master of Education). Others (Master of Arts, Master of Science) do not.

Program is the student’s primary field of study. This is the student’s major. Programs offered at UF are approved by the Graduate Council, Faculty Senate, Board of Trustees, and Florida Board of Governors (specialist and doctoral degrees). The degree and program name appear on the student’s transcript. Available programs are identified under the degree name in the list of graduate degrees and programs.

Co-major is a course of study allowing two majors for one Ph.D. degree. Each co-major must be approved by the Graduate Council.

Concentration is a subprogram in a major. Concentrations offered at UF are approved by the Graduate Council. The concentration, degree, and program may appear on the student transcript.

Minor is a block of course work completed in any academic unit outside the major, if approved for master’s or doctoral programs listed in this catalog. If a student earns more than one course from an academic unit contributing to the major of another, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing academic unit.  If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee must include a representative from the minor field. A minor requires at least 6 to 15 credits depending on the program. The minor appears on the student’s transcript along with the program name and the degree awarded.

Specialization is an informal designation used by academic units to indicate areas of research or scholarly strength, and has no formal significance. Track and emphasis are similar unofficial terms. No tracks, emphases, or specializations appear in official lists in this catalog or on the student transcript.

Graduate certificate may be offered by an academic unit along with a graduate degree. The certificate indicates that the student took a required number of courses in a special area. It requires Graduate Council approval but is not listed on the student transcript.

Multi-college program is a degree program offered through more than one college.

Combined degree program is a combined bachelor’s and master’s degree program allowing an academically advanced undergraduate student to take graduate courses before completing the bachelor’s degree and to count 12 graduate credits toward both degrees. Students admitted into a combined program will normally have above average GPAs and superior scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing portions of the GRE. Individual academic units determine whether a combined degree program is appropriate. Combined degree programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

Cooperative degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded by UF with more than one institution authorized to provide course work.

Jointly conferred degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded jointly by UF and another institution.

Joint degree program is a course of study that leads simultaneously to a graduate degree and a professional degree (i.e., D.M.D., D.V.M., J.D., M.D., Pharm.D.). Normally 12 credits of professional courses are counted toward the graduate degree and 12 credits of graduate courses are counted toward the professional degree. Individual academic units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate. Joint programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

Concurrent degree program is simultaneous study on an individualized basis that leads to two master’s degrees in two different graduate programs or two master’s degrees in the same major. Such a program is initiated by the student and requires prior approval of each academic unit and the Graduate School. If the student is approved to pursue two master’s degrees, no more than 9 credits of course work from one degree program may be applied toward the second master’s degree.

Catalog year refers to the rules in effect during the first year a degree-seeking student enrolls in a program; the set of requirements a student must fulfill. If the student takes time off, then the catalog year is the academic year of readmission.

Listing of Degrees and Programs

See the Programs Section of this catalog  for specializations in the approved programs.

T=thesis or dissertation N=non-thesis or no dissertation. Degree names and correct abbreviations are listed in bold. Possible majors (if different than the degree name) are listed in normal type.

Possible concentrations that are not interdisciplinary are listed under the major in italics. Interdisciplinary concentrations can be found in the Interdisciplinary Concentrations section of this catalog.

Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)N
Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) T
Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.)
N
  Food and Resource Economics
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) T
Master of Arts (M.A.)
 

Anthropology T/N
Art Education T/N
Art T/N
Art History T
Business Administration
           MarketingT/N
Classical Studies T
Communication Sciences and Disorders T/N
Criminology, Law and Society T/N
Digital Arts and Sciences T
Economics T/N
English T/N
French and Francophone Studies T/N
Geography T
           Applications of Geographic Technologies
German T/N
History T/N
International Business T/N
Latin T
Latin American Studies T
Linguistics T/N
Mathematics T/N
Museology T
Museum Studies T
Philosophy T/N
Political Science T/N 
           International Development Policy and Administration
           Political Campaigning
           Public Affairs

  Political Science – International Relations T/N
Psychology T/N
Religion T/N
    Jewish Studies
  Sociology T/N
Spanish T/N
Women’s Studies T/N
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.) T
  Majors are those listed for the Master of Education degree.
Master of Arts in Mass Communication (M.A.M.C.) T/N
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)
N
 

Anthropology
French and Francophone Studies
Latin
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political Science–International Relations
Spanish

Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.) T
Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.)
N
  Building Construction
    Sustainable Construction
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) N
  Business Administration
    Competitive Strategy
Entrepreneurship
Finance
General Business
Global Management
Graham-Buffett Security Analysis
Human Resource Management
Information Systems and Operations Management
International Studies
Latin American Business
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Sports Administration
Master of Education (M.Ed.) N
 

Curriculum and Instruction
Early Childhood Education
Educational Leadership
Elementary Education
English Education
Foreign Language Education
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mathematics Education
Mental Health Counseling
Reading Education
Research and Evaluation Methodology
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Science Education
Social Studies Education
Special Education
Student Personnel in Higher Education

Master of Engineering (M.E.) T/N
  Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Master of Family, Youth and Community Sciences (M.F.Y.C.S.) N
    Community Studies
Family and Youth Development
Nonprofit Organizations Development
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) T
  Art
Creative Writing
Theatre
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) N
Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.)
N
  Forest Resources and Conservation
Geomatics
Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) N
Master of Health Science (M.H.S.)
T/N
  Occupational Therapy
Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Historic Preservation (M.H.P) T
Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) T
Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.) N
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) T
Master of Latin (M.L.) N
Master of Laws (LL.M.)
  Comparative Law N
Environmental and Land Use LawN
International TaxationN
TaxationN
Master of Music (M.M.) T
  Music
    Choral Conducting
Composition
Instrumental Conducting
Music History and Literature
Music Theory
Performance
Sacred Music
  Music Education
Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) N
Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)
N
    Biostatistics
Environmental Health
Epidemiology
Health Management and Policy
Public Health Practice
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Master of Science (M.S.)
  Aerospace Engineering T/N
Agricultural and Biological Engineering T/N
Agricultural Education and Communication T/N
 

Agronomy T/N
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Animal Sciences T/N
Applied Physiology and Kinesiology T/N

    Athletic Training/Sport Medicine
Biobehavioral Science
Clinical Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology
Human Performance
 

Astronomy T/N
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Biomedical Engineering T/N
BiostatisticsT/N
Botany T
Business Administration T/N

    Marketing
Retailing
  Chemical Engineering T/N
Chemistry T/N
Civil Engineering T/N
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering T/N
Computer Engineering T/N
Computer and Information Sciences T/N
Dental Sciences T
     Endodontics
Orthodontics
Periodontics
Prosthodontics
 

Digital Arts and Sciences T
Electrical and Computer Engineering T/N
Entomology and Nematology T/N
Entrepreneurship T/N
Environmental Engineering Sciences T/N
Epidemiology T

    Biostatistics
Health Management Policy
  Family, Youth, and Community Sciences T
    Community Studies
Family and Youth Development
Nonprofit Organizations Development
 

Finance T/N
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences T
Food and Resource Economics T/N
            Agribusiness
Food Science and Human Nutrition T/N
             Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation T/N

   

Geomatics
Ecological Restoration

  Geography T
    Applications of Geographic technologies 
  Geology T
Health Education and Behavior T/N
Horticultural Science T/N
    Environmental Horticulture
Horticultural Sciences
  Industrial and Systems Engineering T/N
Information Systems and Operations Management T/N
    Supply Chain Management
  Interdisciplinary Ecology T/N
Management T/N
    Health Care Risk Management
Geriatric Care Management
  Marketing T
Materials Science and Engineering T/N
Mathematics T/N
Mechanical Engineering T/N
Medical Sciences T
    Translational Biotechnology
  Microbiology and Cell Science T/N
Nuclear Engineering Sciences T/N
Physics T/N
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Plant Pathology T/N
Psychology T/N
Real Estate T/N
Recreation, Parks, and Tourism T/N
    Natural Resource Recreation
Therapeutic Recreation
Tourism
  Soil and Water Science T/N
Sport Management T/N
Veterinary Medical Sciences T/N
    Forensic Toxicology
  Wildlife Ecology and Conservation T/N
Zoology T/N
Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) T
     
Master of Science in Building Construction (M.S.B.C.) T
  Building Construction
    Sustainable Construction
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) T/N
  Nursing
    Midwifery
Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S.P.) T/N
  Pharmaceutical Sciences
   

Forensic Drug Chemistry
Forensic Science
Forensic Serology and DNA
Medicinal Chemistry

Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy

Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.) T
Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.)
N
  Astronomy
Botany
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Zoology

Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) N

Master of Sustainable Development Practice (MDP) N

Engineer (Engr.) T/N

  A special degree requiring 1 year of graduate work beyond the master’s degree. For a list of the approved majors, see those listed for the Master of Engineering degree, except Biomedical Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering.
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) N
  A special degree requiring 1 year of graduate work beyond the master’s degree. For a list of the approved programs, see those listed for the Doctor of Education degree.
Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) N
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) T
  Curriculum and Instruction
Educational Leadership
    Educational Policy
  Higher Education Administration
    Educational Policy
 

Marriage and Family Counseling
Mental Health Counseling
Research and Evaluation Methodology
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Special Education
Student Personnel in Higher Education

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) T
  Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Education and Communication
Agronomy
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology
Animal Sciences
Anthropology
Art History
Astronomy
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Mammalian Genetics
  Biomedical Engineering
Biostatistics
Botany
Business Administration
    Accounting
Finance
Information Systems and Operations Management
Insurance
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
  Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
 

Civil Engineering
Classical Studies
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Computer Engineering
Counseling Psychology
Criminology, Law and Society
Curriculum and Instruction
Design, Construction, and Planning
               Urban and Regional Planning
Economics
Educational Leadership

 
    Educational Policy
  Electrical and Computer Engineering
English
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Epidemiology
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
    Food Science
  Forest Resources and Conservation
    Geomatics
  Genetics and Genomics
Geography
Geology
German
Health and Human Performance
    Biobehavioral Science
Exercise Physiology
Health Behavior
Recreation, Parks, and Tourism
Sport Management
  Health Services Research
Higher Education Administration
    Educational Policy
  History
Horticultural Science
    Environmental Horticulture
Horticulture Sciences
  Industrial and Systems Engineering
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Linguistics
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mass Communication
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Sciences
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Genetics
Immunology and Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Physiology and Pharmacology
  Mental Health Counseling
Microbiology and Cell Science
  Music
    Composition
Music History and Literature
  Music Education
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Nursing Sciences
Nutritional Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Medicinal Chemistry
Medicinal Chemistry and Toxicology
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Public Affairs
  Philosophy
Physics
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology
Plant Pathology
Political Science
    Educational Policy
  Psychology
    Clinical and Health Psychology
Psychology
  Rehabilitation Science
Religion
Research and Evaluation Methodology
Romance Languages
    French and Francophone Studies
Spanish
  School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Sociology
Soil and Water Science
Special Education
Statistics
Veterinary Medical Sciences
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Zoology
Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.) N

Requirements for Master’s Degrees

The master’s degree is conferred only on completing a coherent and focused program of advanced study. Each academic unit sets its own minimum degree requirements beyond the minimum required by the Graduate Council.

General Regulations for Master’s Degrees

Graduate School regulations are as follows. Colleges and academic units may have additional regulations beyond those stated below. Unless otherwise indicated in the next sections on master’s degrees, these general regulations apply to all master’s degree programs at the University.

Course requirements: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered 5000 and above. The program of course work for a master’s degree must be approved by the student’s adviser, supervisory committee, or faculty representative of the academic unit. No more than 9 credits from a previous master’s degree program may apply toward a second master’s degree. These credits are applied only with the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Major: Work in the major must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work outside the major, 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if part of an approved plan of study.

Minor: Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major. If a student earns more than one course from an academic unit contributing to the major of another, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing academic unit. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits of work are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors may be taken with the major academic unit’s permission. A 3.00 (truncated) GPA is required for minor credit.

Degree requirements: Unless otherwise specified, for any master’s degree, the student must earn at least 30 credits as a graduate student at UF. No more than 9 of the 30 credits (earned with a grade of A, A-, B+, or B) may be transferred from institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least half of the required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major.

Transfer of credit: Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include no more than 9 credits from institution/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at the University of Florida. Credits transferred from other universities are applied toward the degree requirements, but grades earned are not computed in the student’s grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the student’s supervisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for a master’s degree must be made during the student’s first term of enrollment in the Graduate School.

The supervisory committee is responsible for using established criteria to ensure the academic integrity of course work before accepting graduate transfer credits.

Supervisory committee: The student’s supervisory committee must be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to the Graduate School and no later than the second term of graduate study.

Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective academic unit chair, approved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. Only Graduate Faculty may serve on a supervisory committee. If a student takes fewer than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of the term during which the student has accumulated 12 or more credits or the end of the second term. If a minor is designated for any degree, a representative from that minor is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are designated, two representatives are needed.

The supervisory committee for a master’s degree with a thesis should consist of at least two Graduate Faculty members, unless otherwise specified. If a minor is designated, the committee must include a Graduate Faculty member from the minor department.

A supervisory committee for a master’s degree without thesis should consist of at least one Graduate Faculty member, unless otherwise specified. It is optional for the academic unit to input the committee into Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). If a minor is designated for a non-thesis degree, the name of the minor representative must be submitted to the Graduate School via GIMS.

Language requirements: (1) Each academic unit determines whether a reading knowledge of a foreign language is required. The requirement varies from one academic unit to another, and the student should check with the appropriate academic unit for specific information. (2) All candidates must be able to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee.

Examination: Each candidate must pass a final comprehensive examination. Some programs use different terminology, such as capstone course. This examination must cover at least the candidate’s field of concentration. It must occur no earlier than the term before the degree is awarded.

Time limitation: All work (including transferred credit) counted toward the master’s degree must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

Leave of absence: Any student who will not register at UF for a period of more than 1 term needs prior written approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence for a designated period of time. This approval remains in the student’s departmental file. The Graduate School does not require notification. The student must reapply for admission on return. See Readmission and Catalog Year.

Master of Arts and Master of Science

The general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees also apply to the following degrees: Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Mass Communication, Master of Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in Pharmacy, and Master of Science in Statistics. There are additional requirements for specialized degrees.

Course requirements: A master’s degree with thesis requires at least 30 credits including up to 6 credits of Research for Master’s Thesis (6971). All thesis students must register for an appropriate number of credits in 6971.

A non-thesis Master of Arts or Master of Science degree requires at least 30 credits. No more than 6 of those credits can be from S/U courses. Non-thesis students cannot use Research for Master’s Thesis (6971).

For all master’s programs, at least half the required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major. One or two minors of at least 6 credits each may be taken, but a minor is not required by the Graduate School. Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major.

Non-thesis M.S. engineering programs: Students in engineering, if working at off-campus centers, must take half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a comprehensive written examination by a committee recommended by the Dean of the College of Engineering and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. This written comprehensive examination may be taken at an off-campus site.

Master’s thesis requirements: Each master’s thesis candidate must prepare and present a thesis that shows independent investigation.  It must be acceptable, in form and content, to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, guided by the Graduate School’s format requirements. The academic unit is responsible for quality and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate School Editorial Office, as agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to briefly review theses and dissertations for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as required.

Format requirements:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/editorial-format.pdf

Format examples:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/format.html#samples

Checklist:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf

Application Support Center/Electronic Theses and Dissertation Lab:
http://etd.helpdesk.ufl.edu

Graduate School Editorial Office:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html#contacts

Gatorlink e-mail requirement: UF requires students to maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail accounts. Accordingly, the Editorial Office only communicates with students through official Gatorlink e-mail.

Thesis first submission: When first presented to the Graduate School Editorial Office, the thesis must be successfully defended. Therefore, the final examination data must be posted in GIMS, prior to the student attempting to submit their thesis document for review by the Graduate School’s editorial staff.  Directly after the oral defense, the Academic Unit must submit the Final Exam Form and the UF Publishing Agreement through the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the thesis should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the thesis, before attempting to make submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards required for an editorial review

Should the document pass the submission requirements and appear acceptable for review, the Editorial Office will e-mail the student, using their Gatorlink email address, confirming the submission, and responding with an acceptance e-mail. Should the document not pass first submission requirements, a denial e-mail will instead be sent, advising the student of their options at that time.  This notice must be addressed immediately.  Once a successful first submission has been achieved and the document has been reviewed by one of the Graduate School’s editors, another e-mail is sent, providing editorial feedback to the student and committee chair.  The student is responsible for retrieving the thesis, review comments, and resolving any deficits related to the format requirements. Students should promptly make all required changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf for Editorial Final Submission: After changes have been made to the satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page is submitted electronically, via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). This data is then transmitted to the Graduate School Editorial Office.  This must be completed by the Editorial Office’s Final Submission Deadline.  Once submitted, the student should upload and submit the final pdf of the electronic thesis, using the Editorial Document Management (EDM) system.  Next, the document will undergo a final review by one of the Graduate School Representatives. The Editorial Office ensures that the format is acceptable, that all indicated changes were made, and that all of the hyperlinks work within the document. The Graduate School Representative then e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD (electronic thesis or dissertation). If accepted, no further changes are allowed to be made to the document.  If changes are still required, the student must satisfy all stipulations set by the Graduate School’s Editorial Office by the Final Clearance Deadline.  This deadline is firm, and no exceptions can be granted.  Therefore, if changes are necessitated, the student should resubmit the corrected document as soon as possible because all documents must be confirmed with final approval emails from the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Clearance Deadline. When all changes have been made and approved, the Editorial Office will email the Committee Chair and the student with a message, indicating the student has achieved Editorial Final Clearance.  

Editorial Final Clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final thesis must be confirmed as accepted, by email, by 5:00 p.m. on this deadline. This deadline only applies, if all other posted deadlines for the term have been appropriately met.  Since there are hundreds of students concurrently completing the process, most students complete all requirements well in advance, in order to ensure they do not face the chance of not graduating within their intended term.

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having written the thesis. A copyright page should be included immediately after the title page to indicate this.

Thesis language: Theses must be written in English, except for students pursuing degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in these disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic language. A foreign language thesis should have the Acknowledgements, Abstract, and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1 should also be in English.

Journal articles: A thesis may include  journal articles as  chapters, if all copyright considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 is a general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last chapter contains the general conclusions, once again tying everything together into a unified whole. Any chapter representing a journal article requires a footnote at the bottom of the first page of the chapter: “Reprinted with permission from … ” giving the source, just as it appears in the list of references. The thesis must have only 1 abstract and 1 reference list.

Change from thesis to non-thesis option: Permission of the supervisory committee is needed to change from thesis to non-thesis option. This permission must be forwarded to the Graduate School by midpoint of the final term via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). The candidate must meet all the requirements of the non-thesis option as specified above. A maximum of 3 credits earned with a grade of S in 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis) can be counted toward the degree requirements only if converted to credit as A, A-, B+, or B in Individual Work. The supervisory committee must indicate that the work was productive in and by itself and that the work warrants credit as a special problem or special topic course.

Supervisory committee: The student’s supervisory committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to the Graduate School and no later than the second term of graduate study. Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective academic unit chair, approved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. Only Graduate Faculty may serve on a supervisory committee. If a student takes fewer than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of the term during which the student has accumulated 12 or more credits or the end of the second term. If a minor is designated for any degree, a representative from that minor is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are designated, two representatives are needed.

Thesis final examination: When most of the student’s course work is completed, and the thesis is in final form, the supervisory committee must examine the student orally or in writing on (1) the thesis, (2) the major subjects, (3) the minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature pertaining to the field of study.

The candidate and the supervisory committee chair or cochair must be physically present together at the same location. With approval of the entire committee, other members may attend the defense remotely, using modern communication technology. The defense date must be fewer than 6 months before degree award. All forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate and the supervisory committee chair sign the UF Publishing Agreement form; and the entire supervisory committee signs the ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report. If thesis changes are requested, the supervisory Committee Chair or the Committee’s designee may hold the ETD Signature Page, until all requirements are met regarding the thesis. Once all stipulations of the Committee members are satisfied, and before the Editorial Office’s Final Submission deadline for the term of intended degree award, verification of completion of this form must be submitted electronically via GIMS.

Non-thesis final comprehensive examination: Non-thesis students must pass a comprehensive written or oral examination on the major and on the minor if a minor is designated. This comprehensive examination must be taken no more than 6 months before the degree is awarded.

Other Master’s Degrees

Although the general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees also apply to the following discipline-specific degrees, there are some important differences. For detailed requirements, see  the Programs Section of this catalog . In addition, the Graduate School monitors the following requirements for these specialized degrees.

Master of Accounting

The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is the graduate degree for students seeking professional careers in public accounting, business organizations, and government. The M.Acc. program offers specializations in auditing/financial accounting, accounting systems, and taxation.

The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-year program with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting and the Master of Accounting degrees on satisfactory completion of the 150-credit program. The entry point into the 3/2 is the start of the senior year.

Students who have already completed an undergraduate degree in accounting may enter the 1-year M.Acc. program, which requires 34 credits of course work. At least 18 credits must be in graduate-level accounting, excluding preparatory courses. All students must take a final comprehensive examination. For details about requirements, see General Regulations for master’s degrees.

M.Acc./J.D. program: This joint program culminates in both the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree awarded by the College of Law and the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree awarded by the Graduate School. The program is for students with an undergraduate degree in accounting, who are interested in advanced studies in both accounting and law. About 20 credits fewer are needed for the joint program than if the two degrees were earned separately. The two degrees are awarded after completing curriculum requirements for both degrees. Students must take the GMAT (or the GRE), and also the LSAT before admission, and must meet the admission requirements for the College of Law (J.D.) and the Fisher School of Accounting (M.Acc.).

Master of Advertising

The Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) program develops leaders in the profession by giving students theoretical, research, and decision-making skills essential for strategic advertising and integrated communications planning; and the opportunity to develop expertise in an area such as account management, research, creative strategy, media planning, international and cross cultural advertising, new technology, special market advertising, and advertising sales management.

Students without a basic course or substantial professional experience in marketing or advertising must complete articulation courses before entering the program. All students must complete a basic statistics course before entering. The M.Adv. requires at least 33 credits and a thesis. Some areas allow a terminal project in lieu of thesis (with permission from the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty).

Students select a supervisory committee to guide selection of courses, selection of thesis topic (or project in lieu of thesis), and completion of the thesis or project. At least one committee member must be from the Department of Advertising’s Graduate Faculty.

Students complete and orally defend their theses or projects. The student’s supervisory committee is responsible for evaluating the thesis or project and the final defense.

Master of Agribusiness

The Master of Agribusiness (M.Ab.) degree program offers advanced study for students seeking careers in sales, marketing, and management with organizations that operate mainly in the food industry and agribusiness sector. Through rigorous practical course work, students can capitalize on the program’s broad-based resources, as students look forward to careers as food marketers, commodity merchandisers, and agribusiness managers. Students may focus on areas such as strategic sales, international marketing, human resource management, and the futures market. This program is not recommended for students seeking careers in research and university teaching.

The program requires at least 30 credits (core and elective courses in finance, marketing, management, decision-making, and quantitative methods relevant to agribusiness). These courses prepare students to analyze current situations, anticipate opportunities, and develop effective action plans. Before starting the program, students must have taken and successfully passed prerequisite courses in marketing, management, statistics, and finance. Contact the academic unit for information on additional prerequisite courses and program requirements.

Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) is an accredited graduate degree meeting the professional requirements of the National Architectural Accrediting Board for students who wish to qualify for registration and practice as architects. Candidates are admitted from architectural, related, and unrelated undergraduate backgrounds; professional experience is encouraged but not required.

The M.Arch. requires at least 52 credits, including no more than 6 credits in ARC 6971 or 6979. Course sequences in design history and theory, structures, technology, and practice must be completed. Students are encouraged to propose individual programs of study (outside of required courses), and interdisciplinary work is encouraged.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Science in Teaching

These degrees (M.A.T., M.S.T.) combine graduate study in a discipline with selected education courses and a teaching internship, providing flexible curricula that prepare students for a variety of options including teaching and further graduate work.

Requirements for the degrees are as follows:

  1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language if required by the student’s major.
  2. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits while registered as a graduate student, with work distributed as follows:
    • At least 18 credits in the major and 6 credits in the minor.
    • Six credits in an academic unit internship in teaching (6943 Internship in College Teaching). Three years of successful teaching experience in a state-certified school may be substituted for the internship requirement, and credits thus made available may be used for further work in the major, the minor, or in education.
    • At least one course selected from three or more of the following: social and/or psychological foundations of education; education technology; counselor education; special education, and community college curriculum. Other areas may be added or substituted at the discretion of the supervisory committee. These courses may be used to comprise a minor.
  3. Off-campus work: At least 8 to 16 credits (at the academic unit’s discretion), including at least 6 credits in one term, must be earned on the Gainesville campus. Beyond that, credits earned in off-campus UF courses approved by the Graduate School are accepted if they are appropriate to the student’s degree program as determined by the supervisory committee.
  4. At degree completion, the student needs at least 36 credits in the major for certification purposes.
  5. The student must pass a final comprehensive examination (written, oral, or both). This examination covers the field of concentration and the minor.

Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning

The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.) is a graduate degree for professional urban and regional planners and meets the educational requirements for the American Institute of Certified Planners. The program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. General requirements are the same as for other Master of Arts degrees with thesis, except that the minimum registration required is 52 credits including no more than 6 credits in URP 6971 or 6979. All areas allow a project (requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis (with permission from the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty).

M.A.U.R.P./J.D. joint program: A 4-year program leading to the Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the College of Law and the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, Department of Urban and Regional Planning. For students interested in the legal problems of urban and regional planning, this program blends law studies with relevant course work in the planning curriculum. Students receive both degrees at the end of a 4-year course of study whereas separate programs would require 5 years. Students must take the GRE and the LSAT before admission, must be admitted to both programs, and must complete the first year of law school course work before commingling law and planning courses. A thesis is required on completing the course work.

Interested students should apply to both the Holland Law Center and the Graduate School, noting on the application the joint nature of their admission requests. For more information on the program, contact the Holland Law Center and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Master of Building Construction

The Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) degree is for students pursuing advanced work in construction management, construction techniques, and research problems in the construction field.

General requirements are the same as for the Master of Science in Building Construction degree except that the M.B.C. requires at least 36 graduate credits. A thesis is not required. All candidates are required to pass a comprehensive examination at the completion of course work.

Joint Program: The M.B.C./J.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Levin College of Law.

Master of Business Administration

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree gives students (1) conceptual knowledge for understanding the functions and behaviors common to business organizations and (2) analytical, problem-solving, and decision-making skills essential for effective management. Emphasis is on developing the student’s capacities and skills for business decision making. 

The traditional MBA curriculum is structured so that students may extend their knowledge in a specialized field. The program offers certificate programs in, financial services, hospitality management, supply chain management, information systems and operations management, entrepreneurship and technology management, and global management, and concentrations in finance, security analysis, real estate, competitive strategy, marketing, entrepreneurship, information systems and operations management, management, global management, human resource management, Latin American business, international studies, and sports administration.

Admission: Applicants for admission must submit recent official scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and official transcripts for all previous academic work. All program options require at least two years of full-time professional work experience performed after receiving an acceptable bachelor’s degree, along with written essays and personal recommendations from employers. All qualified applicants to the full-time (traditional) program are asked to interview as part of the admissions process. Applicants whose native, first language is not English must submit acceptable scores from one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), IELTS (International English Language Testing System), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute program. Admission is competitive and class size is limited.

A diverse student body is seen as an important asset of the program. Accordingly, the backgrounds of students include a wide range of disciplines and cultures. With the exception of the Option B program, the curriculum assumes no previous academic work in business administration; however, enrolling students find introductory course work in statistics, calculus, and financial accounting beneficial.

For more specific information on other aspects of the program, contact the Office of Admissions, UF MBA Program, 310 Hough Hall, P.O. Box 117152, Gainesville FL 32611-7152, or visit the website, http://www.floridamba.ufl.edu.

Course work: A minimum of 48 qualified credits of course work are required for the two-year option, and one-year Option A. The one-year Option B requires a minimum of 32 credits. Credits cannot be transferred from another institution or program.

Options

Traditional MBA Two-Year Option: This 48 credit program requires 4 terms of full-time study over two academic years. Students are admitted for the fall term only; many students spend the summer between academic years working at internships. This option requires at least two years of full-time, post-undergraduate work experience as well as a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four year institution.

Traditional MBA One-Year, Option A: This 48 credit program admits students only in the late spring and students are expected to complete all coursework within 12 months. Successful candidates are expected to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four year institution and two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Traditional MBA One-Year, Option B: This 32 credit program admits students for the summer term and are expected to complete all course work within 10 months. Applicants to this program are required to have a bachelor’s degree in business from a four-year accredited institution (conferred within the last seven years) and at least two years of post-undergraduate work experience. Students take primarily graduate business electives during summer B, fall, and spring terms and graduate in May.

Executive MBA Program: A 20-month program for working professionals, students attend classes one extended weekend per month (Friday-Sunday). The program is divided into five terms each lasting about four months. The program starts in August, and includes a one-week two credit international experience. The international study tour is a program requirement; students travel abroad in May for a week of experiential learning through lectures or discussions with local business and government leaders. The tour will include a combination of lectures, group projects and/or site visits. This option requires eight years of post-undergraduate work experience, and students are expected to have people or project management responsibilities in their current positions.

Professional Two-Year MBA: This 27-month program starts in September and February and is designed for professionals who work full time while pursuing their degrees part time. Students attend classes one weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a one-week in-residence elective class. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Professional One-Year MBA: For students with acceptable undergraduate degrees in business (completed within seven years before starting the program), this 16-month option starts in January. Students attend classes one weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a one-week in-residence elective class. The first meeting includes a one-week, on-campus foundations review of basic course work. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet Two-Year MBA: This 27-month program starts in August and February and allows students to earn their MBA primarily through class lectures downloaded to their laptops or iPads. Students interact with faculty and classmates via e-mail, synchronous group discussion software, asynchronous class presentation software, and multimedia courseware. Students visit campus one weekend (Saturday-Sunday) every four months. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet One-Year MBA: For students with acceptable undergraduate degrees in business (completed within seven years before starting this program), this 16-month option starts in January and gives students and faculty the same interactive technology as the Internet Two-Year MBA. Students visit campus one weekend (Saturday-Sunday) every four months. The first meeting includes a oneweek, on-campus foundations review of basic course work. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Professional MBA in South Florida: This 24 month program starts during the late summer, and is designed for professionals who wish to continue working full time while pursuing their degrees part time. Students attend classes once every three weeks (Saturday-Sunday) at the UF MBA Sunrise Center in Sunrise, Florida. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./M.S. in medical sciences (biotechnology) program: Concurrent studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Master of Science degrees, offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine, are in response to the needs of businesses engaged in biotechnological sciences. Both degrees can be obtained in 3 years. The program requires 1 year of science courses, 1 year of business courses, and a year devoted to research and electives in business and science. Research is done in one of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research core laboratories. Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. A student must at all times remain in good standing in both degree programs to remain in the M.B.A. program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./Ph.D. in medical sciences program: Concurrent studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine. This 120-credit program trains research scientists to assume responsibilities as managers of biotechnical industries. Estimated time to complete both degrees is 5 to 7 years. Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both programs. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

MBA./J.D. program: A program of joint studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Juris Doctor degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the Warrington College of Business Administration and the Levin College of Law. Current M.B.A. or J.D. students must declare their intent to apply for the second degree during their first year. Applications are then due according to admission schedules for that year. Both degrees are awarded after a 4-year course of study. Students must take both the LSAT and the GMAT before admission and meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./Pharm.D. program in management and pharmacy administration: A program of concurrent studies culminating in both the Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees allows students interested in both management and pharmacy administration to obtain the appropriate education in both areas. Candidates must meet the entrance requirements and follow the entrance procedures of both the Warrington College of Business Administration and the College of Pharmacy, and admission to the two programs must be simultaneous. The degrees may be granted after 5 years of study. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./M.I.M. program in international management: A dual degree program between the University of Florida (UF) and the American Graduate School of International Management (Thunderbird) makes it possible to earn both degrees after 3 years of study. Students start the program at UF and apply to Thunderbird in their first year. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

World Leadership M.B.A. option: A 16-month program for executives. The program is divided into 5 modules and starts in January. This consortium program will bring together top executives from all over the world to participate in a truly global M.B.A. experience. During the course of the program, students attend classes in three 2-week residencies and two 1-week residencies. These residencies will take place in 5 different countries (U.S., Belgium, U.K., India, and China). World Leadership M.B.A. graduates will earn a consortium Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Florida and Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School, plus a Master of Business Administration degree from Aston Business School. This program requires 10 years of post undergraduate work experience, and students are expected to have significant people or project management responsibilities in their current positions.

Exchange programs: The M.B.A. program offers second-year students exchange opportunities at numerous international universities. Currently, exchange programs exist with schools in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Canada, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. For a complete list of exchange partners, see http://www.cba.ufl.edu/sb/intlprograms/uf/exchange.asp.

 Master of Education

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree program meets the need for professional personnel to serve a variety of functions required in established and emerging educational activities of modern society. A thesis is not required.

All M.Ed. programs require at least 36 credits, with at least half of these credits earned in courses in the College of Education. Up to 6 credit earned from 3000- and 4000-level courses taken outside the academic unit may be counted toward the minimum requires for the degree provided they are part of an approved plan of study. (See also General Requirements for Master’s Degrees.)

At least 16 credits must be earned while the student is enrolled as a graduate student in courses offered on the Gainesville campus of the University of Florida including registration for at least 6 credits in a single term. This requirement may deviate where distance education programs are considered.

Master of Engineering

Students may choose a thesis or non-thesis option for the Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree. To be eligible for admission to the M.E. program, students must have earned a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited college or they must complete articulation work for equivalence. Admission requirements of the Graduate School must be met. The College of Engineering may use the Fundamentals of Engineering examination in lieu of the GRE for admitting students into the non-thesis master’s degree programs. Students who do not meet the ABET requirement may be admitted to the Master of Science program (see section on Master of Arts and Master of Science).

The non-thesis M.E. degree is a 30-credit course-work–only degree (practice-oriented project or capstone course may be included in the 30 credits). At least 15 credits must be in the student’s major at the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major, courses numbered 3000 or above (not to exceed 6 credits) may be taken if they are part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required. Two 6-credit minors may be taken. At the discretion of individual engineering academic units, an oral or written examination may be required.

The thesis option requires 30 credits of course work, including up to 6 credits of 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). At least 12 credits (not counting 6971) must be in the student’s major. Courses in the major must be at the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major, up to 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required. Two 6-credit minors may be taken at the discretion of the academic unit. A comprehensive oral and/or written final examination is required.

An off-campus (distance learning) student who is a candidate for the non-thesis M.E. degree must take half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a comprehensive written examination administered by a committee from the academic unit. If the student has a minor, the committee must include a member representing that minor.

Master of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences

The Master of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (M.F.Y.C.S.) degree prepares students for mid-level leadership positions in public and private organizations, agencies, and businesses that address the needs of families, youths, and communities. The program of study provides the student with a broad base of knowledge in the discipline. It includes required courses in the theoretical foundations of the discipline, public policy analysis, program planning and evaluation, nonprofit management and ethics for practitioners. This program requires at least 32 credit hours (half of which are electives the student selects with the supervisory committee). Completing the degree requires comprehensive written and oral examinations.

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree is offered with majors in art, creative writing, and theatre. Requirements are the same as for the Master of Arts with thesis, except the M.F.A. requires at least 60 credits (54 for creative writing), including 6 to 9 credits in 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). Students in art and theatre substitute 6973 (Individual Project) creative work in lieu of the written thesis.

Admission: Applicants requesting admission to any of the programs should have an earned baccalaureate degree in the same or a closely related field from an accredited institution. Students must fulfill the admission requirements of their disciplines and the Graduate School’s admission criteria. In cases where the undergraduate degree is not in the area chosen for graduate study, the student must demonstrate a level of achievement fully equivalent to the bachelor’s degree in the chosen graduate field. A candidate deficient in certain areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully completing appropriate courses.

Art or theatre candidates also must submit a portfolio of the creative work, or must audition, before being accepted into the program. Creative writing candidates must submit 2 short stories, 2 chapters of a novel, or 6 to 10 poems. Three years of work in residence are usually needed to complete degree requirements. If deficiencies must be removed, the residency could be longer. See the Programs Section of this catalog  for Art, English, and Theatre.

Art: The M.F.A. degree with a major in art involves advanced visual research for those who wish to attain a professional level of proficiency in studio work. Specialization is offered in the studio areas of ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and digital media. For studio work, the M.F.A. is generally the terminal degree and is often the required credential for teachers of art in colleges and universities.

In addition to the general requirements above, students must take at least 60 credits. Requirements include 42 credits in studio courses (24 in specialization, 12 in electives, and 6 in ART 6973C); 6 credits in art history; 3 credits in teaching art in higher education (required if the student is to accept a teaching assistantship); 3 credits in aesthetics, criticism, or theory; and 6 credits of electives. The College requires the student to leave documentation of thesis project work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.

Creative writing: The M.F.A. in creative writing develops writers of poetry and fiction by a series of workshops and literature seminars. Candidates are expected to produce a thesis (a manuscript of publishable poetry or fiction) at the end of the 3-year program. The degree requires 9 courses (4 workshops, 3 literature courses, and 2 electives), 3 reading tutorials, and a thesis: 48 credits in all. Students take at least 1 workshop each term. All of the literature courses cannot be in the same century. The electives may be literature seminars or workshops; 1 elective may be an approved graduate course outside the Department of English.

Theatre: The M.F.A. degree with a major in theatre is for those interested in production-oriented theatrical careers and teaching. Two specializations are offered: acting and design. The craft skills encompassed in the program are later applied in public and studio productions. The program requires 60 credits, including 18 credits of core classes, 17 credits of specialty training, an internship, and a project in lieu of thesis.

Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

The non-thesis Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) program trains students in the technical aspects of fisheries and aquatic sciences emphasizing written and oral communication of scientific information. Requirements are the same as for the Master of Science degree with the non-thesis option, except that the M.F.A.S. also requires a technical paper. The program requires at least 26 graduate credits of graded course work (at least 16 in the major). The final draft of the technical paper must be submitted to all supervisory committee members for approval at least 3 weeks before the scheduled date of the oral and written final examination.

Master of Forest Resources and Conservation

The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.) degree is for additional professional preparation rather than primary research. Requirements are the same as those listed under General Regulations for master’s degrees, except that the M.F.R.C. requires GRE scores of at least 500 verbal and 500 quantitative.

Work required: At least 32 credits of letter-graded course work with at least 12 credits of graduate course work in the major are required. A thesis is not required, but the student must complete a technical project in an appropriate field. This project may take various forms, such as a literature review, extension publication, video, training manual, or curriculum. The M.F.R.C. requires a final examination covering the candidate’s entire field of study. The student must present the work to the supervisory committee in an on-campus public forum before the final examination.

Master of Health Administration

The Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.), offered by the College of Public Health and Health Professions, trains qualified individuals to become managers and leaders of health care organizations. The degree provides a core of business and analytical skills, concepts and knowledge specific to health administration, opportunities for application and synthesis, and exposure to the field of practice. The M.H.A. program admits students only in the fall term and requires full-time study for 2 years, plus a summer internship between the first and second years. The program requires a total of 63 credits.

Master of Health Science

The Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) degree, offered by the College of Public Health and Health Professions, provides exposure to health research and meets the need for leadership personnel in established and emerging health care programs. The College currently offers programs in occupational therapy and rehabilitation counseling.

There are three paths to enter occupational therapy and attain the Master of Health Science degree. The 4-term thesis option emphasizes research and is the appropriate route for (but not limited to) students seeking admission to the College of Public Health and Health Profession’s Ph.D. program in rehabilitation science. The 3-term non-thesis option emphasizes research and advanced theories related to the practice of occupational therapy. Both options prepare leaders in the profession and require 36 credits. The third option, the distance learning program, is for working professionals to increase knowledge in emerging practice areas and leadership.

The rehabilitation counseling program meets the need for professional personnel to serve in various areas of rehabilitation counseling. The Department requires at least 52 academic credits for most students, including at least 49 credits in the major. Some exceptionally well-qualified students may need fewer credits with approval of the program chair. Work in the major includes both practicum experiences and a full-time internship. Elective courses may complement the major and relate to the student’s career plans. All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination. See General Regulations for requirements for all master’s degrees.

Master of Interior Design

The Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) allows students to direct their attention to a variety of topics including design pedagogy and processes; sustainable, safe, and secure environments; creative performance and innovation; and built heritage conservation.

Work required includes at least 36 credits (no more than 6 thesis credits). Required preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work.

Master of International Construction Management

The Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.) is a non-thesis, distance education, advanced degree program with a research report/project requirement offered by the Rinker School of Building Construction. The M.I.C.M. allows students with computer and Internet access to attend classes at any time, any place and to interact with faculty and classmates via the Internet.

Admissions: Applicants for admission must have:

  • An undergraduate degree,
  • At least 5 years of meaningful, supervisory-level construction management experience,
  • Acceptable GRE scores
  • A grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale,
  • If an international student, an acceptable score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: paper=550, internet=80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77), or successful completion of the UF English Language Institute program, and
  • Sponsorship by the employer.

Work required: The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper-level construction management responsibilities in a multinational construction company. Specializations include sustainable construction, information systems, construction safety, and human resource management. In addition to 6 research-oriented graduate credits, the student selects 1 or 2 specializations and then takes the rest of the required 33 credits from the remaining courses and special electives. Students must pass a comprehensive oral and/or written examination on completing course work and the master’s research report/project.

Master of Landscape Architecture

The degree of Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is the advanced professional degree for graduates with baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture and is a first professional degree for the graduate from a non-landscape architectural background. Candidates are admitted from related and unrelated fields and backgrounds. An advanced professional life experience track is available for eligible candidates.

Work required: Candidates must complete at least 52 credits, including no more than 6 credits of thesis or project. For students without baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture, required preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work. For advanced professional life experience candidates, the minimum requirement is 30 credits, including thesis. At least 50% of all course work must be graduate courses in landscape architecture. Some areas allow a project (requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis, with permission of the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty.

Master of Latin

The Classics Department offers the non-thesis Master of Latin (M.L.) degree, a 30-credit program mainly for currently employed and/or certified teaching professionals who wish to widen their knowledge of Latin, broaden their education in the field of Classics, and enhance their professional qualifications. This degree can be attained by students in residence for fall/spring terms or by a program of summer course work at UF and by directed independent study and/or distance learning courses during the regular academic year.

Students registering during summer terms can complete the degree in 4 years by earning 6 graduate credits each summer (total = 24), plus two 3-credit independent study or distance learning courses during the intervening academic years. Those who already have some graduate credit in Latin, or who can take more credits during the year, can complete the degree more quickly.

Unlike the M.A. degree in Latin, the Master of Latin degree has no thesis requirement, does not prepare students for Ph.D. level studies, and is aimed specifically at currently employed and certified Latin teachers.

Admission: Contact the Department’s Graduate Coordinator or Distance Learning Coordinator before applying. Requirements for the admissions process are:

  • Apply to UF’s Graduate School,
  • Acceptable GRE scores,
  • Three letters of recommendation, and
  • Transcripts recording undergraduate courses (and graduate courses, if any; students must demonstrate the ability to take Latin courses at the graduate level).

Degree requirements include at least 30 credits as a UF graduate student. Of these, no more than 8 credits (grade of A, A-, B+, or B) may be transferred from institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least half of the 30 credits required should be from Latin language and literature courses (LAT or LNW courses at the 5000 level or above). UF graduate-level courses taken before admission to Graduate School (e.g., in the Latin Summer Institutes) may be applied to the 30 credits if approved by the Graduate School. The Department will work closely with individual students to determine how many previous graduate credits at UF or other institutions may be applied to this program.

The student may elect minor work in other academic units (e.g., history, philosophy, art history, religion) although there is no requirement to do so. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors may be taken with departmental permission. A GPA of 3.0 is required for minor credit and for all work counted toward the degree. All work in a minor must be approved by the supervisory committee.

Examination: The supervisory committee administers a final oral and written comprehensive examination at completion of the course work. This examination includes (1) an oral component on Roman literary tradition and (2) a written component covering (a) Latin sight translation and grammar, (b) Roman history and civilization, and if applicable (c) the minor, or minors. As preparation for this examination, the student should read the required reading list of secondary works in English.

Language requirement: The Department for this degree plan does not require, but strongly recommends, at least a reading knowledge of one (or more) of the following: German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Such study will facilitate reading important secondary works not translated into English, enhance travel, and perhaps lead to teaching opportunities in the chosen language at the secondary school level.

Master of Laws in Comparative Law

The Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law) degree is for graduates of foreign law schools who want to enhance their understanding of the American legal system and the English common law system. The program starts with Introduction to American Law, a 4-credit summer course that gives students a foundation in the American legal process. It also helps students acclimate to the College of Law and the University community before starting the academic year. During fall and spring terms, and with the director’s approval, students choose their remaining 22 credits from more than 100 Juris Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses and seminars. For admission information consult the College of Law Catalog or write to the Comparative Law Office, P.O. Box 117643, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7643.

Master of Laws in Environmental and Land Use Law

The Master of Laws in Environmental and Land Use Law degree is a one-year post-J.D. degree providing an opportunity for experienced attorneys, as well as recent law school graduates, to spend an academic year full-time on the UF campus developing in-depth expertise in environmental and land use law.

For more information about the Environmental and Land Use Law Program, contact
University of Florida Levin College of Law, Environmental and Land Use Law Office
P.O. Box 117625
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625

Phone (352-273-0777) or
E -mail to elulp@law.ufl.edu.

Master of Laws in International Taxation

The Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.I.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction for law graduates who plan to specialize in international taxation, in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, and 13 must be graduate-level international tax courses, including a research and writing course.

Master of Laws in Taxation

The Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction for law graduates who plan to specialize in federal taxation and particularly federal income taxation, in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, including a research and writing course.

Master of Music

The Master of Music (M.M.) degree is offered in music or music education. The music program offers the following concentrations: choral conducting, composition, instrumental conducting, music history and literature, ethnomusicology, music theory, performance, and sacred music. The M.M. degree prepares students for careers as teachers in studios, schools, and universities; performers; music historians; music critics; church musicians; composers; conductors; and accompanists.

Admission: Applicants should have a baccalaureate degree in music or a closely related area from an accredited institution and must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School and the College of Fine Arts. Students whose undergraduate degree is in another discipline must demonstrate a level of achievement fully acceptable for master’s level work in this discipline. Applicants normally complete at least 16 credits in music theory, 6 credits in music history, and 12 credits in performance. A candidate deficient in certain undergraduate areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully completing appropriate courses. If remedial work is needed, the residency (usually 4 terms of full-time study) may be longer. An audition is required for all students.

Work required includes at least 32 credits of course work (not counting prerequisite or deficiency courses) incorporating a core of 9 credits. The core in all emphases includes MUS 6716 (MUE 6785 in the music education program), MUT 6629, and one MUH or MUL graduate course. A thesis or creative project in lieu of thesis is required.

The College of Fine Arts reserves the right to retain student work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction. For more information, see the Programs Section of this catalog .

Master of Occupational Therapy

The non-thesis Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) degree program is for students who do not have a degree in occupational therapy, and who want to enter the field of occupational therapy. The program gives students a holistic perspective including an understanding of the philosophical and theoretical bases for practice in the current health care environment. The M.O.T. program provides a strong background in theory, assessment, and therapeutic intervention.

This 5-term program of graduate study consists of 3 terms of classroom course work and 2 terms (24 weeks) of internship. Students enter the program after completing a bachelor’s degree. The M.O.T. degree is awarded after completing 58 credits. Students must receive at least a B (3.00 truncated) on all course work and satisfactory evaluations on all clinical fieldwork.

Master of Public Health

The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) is a non-thesis degree program that prepares students to become effective public health practitioners, scientists, and educators. Graduates can contribute to the health of the local, national, and international communities through advancing public health knowledge and by designing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that prevent disease and promote health. Students have the opportunity to develop skills in 1 of 6 public health concentration areas:

  • Biostatistics: Applying quantitative and analytical methods in public health research and evaluation
  • Environmental health: Assessing risk levels and protecting the public from environmental threats to health
  • Epidemiology: Studying the distribution and determinants of health In populations and communities
  • Public health management and policy: Providing leadership in public health administration and developing policies to promote the public’s health
  • Public health practice: Developing breadth in the field of public health by studying 2 or more of the other concentration areas
  • Social and behavioral sciences: Exploring the unique issues faced by diverse groups and populations and acquiring skills to achieve social and behavioral change.

The M.P.H. degree program is a 48-credit program for individuals with bachelor’s degrees. Those with prior terminal degrees in health-related fields may take the M.P.H. in an accelerated 42-credit format. Several collaborative programs with professional and graduate degrees are available, including D.V.M./M.P.H., J.D./M.P.H., and Pharm.D./M.P.H. A combined degree program for seniors and a 15-credit certificate program also are offered. For additional information, visit http://www.mph.ufl.edu.

Admission: Applicants with any undergraduate major are considered for the program as long as they meet the Graduate School admission requirements and their interests match the program’s philosophy and curriculum.

Work required: In the 48-credit program, students take 16 credits of core public health course work and 5-8 credits of internship. Internships are designed to promote competency in the concentration area and contribute to the student’s career goals. The remaining 24-27 credits include required and elective course work in the concentration area chosen by the student. Specific course requirements vary by concentration area.

Students who have a relevant terminal degree in a health-related field may be eligible for the 42-credit accelerated program, pending M.P.H. admissions committee approval. This program requires completion of 16 credits of core public health course work, 21 credits of concentration course work, and a 5-credit internship.

Master of Science in Architectural Studies

Admission: The Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) is a nonprofessional, research degree for students with undergraduate degrees in any field of study who wish to undertake advanced studies and research in architectural specialties. Specialization is offered in environmental technology, architectural preservation, urban design, history, and theory.

Work required includes at least 35 credits of course work incorporating up to 6 credits of ARC 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). Most course work should be in the School of Architecture, but multidisciplinary electives in planning, history, law, engineering, art history, and real estate are encouraged. Students also may enroll in one of the School’s off-campus programs in Nantucket, in the Caribbean, in Hong Kong, or in Vicenza. A thesis is required.

Requirements for level and distribution of credits, supervisory committee, and final examination are the same as for the Master of Arts and Master of Science with thesis.

Master of Science in Nursing

The College of Nursing offers the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) degree (thesis or non-thesis) with advanced practice preparation for the roles of the nurse practitioner in acute care, adult, family, neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric/mental health, and midwifery nursing. In addition to the advanced practice clinical tracks, the College also offers tracks in public health, adult health clinical nurse specialist, and the clinical nurse leader (CNL). The CNL is a generalist clinician who brings a high level of clinical competence and knowledge to the point of care and serves as a resource for the health care team.

Program requirements include at least 46 credits for advanced practice clinical tracks, and at least 36 credits for the generalist CNL track. Thesis M.S.Nsg. candidates must prepare and present theses acceptable to their supervisory committees and the Graduate School. An oral presentation of the thesis and a comprehensive exam in the major are also required. M.S.N. candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination in the major.

Cooperative M.S.Nsg. degree with Florida State University (FSU) and the University of Florida (UF): For students in the nurse-midwifery clinical track, the cooperative degree program is an approved mechanism allowing students to transfer more than the usual number of semester credit hours (9 vs. 24) from FSU to UF. On completing the curriculum, students are awarded an M.S.Nsg. from UF. Students meet admissions requirements for both universities and take most of the core graduate and primary care courses at FSU; on completing these courses, credits are transferred to UF and students enroll in the UF midwifery clinical track courses. The guidebook for midwifery students explains admissions, advisement, and progression for traditional and cooperative degree students (http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/prospective/curriculum_plans/midwifery%20guidelines.pdf).

Admission: Applicants for all M.S.Nsg. clinical tracks are encouraged to apply by March 15. After March 15, applications are accepted through May 31, and students are accepted on a space-available basis. For admission criteria and information on the application process, see the Master of Science in Nursing page (http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/prospective/prospective_msn.shtml). For general M.S.N. program inquiries, contact Academic Support Services. For specific information on clinical midwifery, contact Dr. Alice Poe, Clinical Coordinator, Nurse Midwifery Track, (904) 244-5174.

Master of Statistics

The Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) degree requires at least 36 credits including at least 30 graduate credits in the major. Courses are selected in consultation with the supervisory committee chair and approved by the supervisory committee. Students must pass two examinations: (1) a first-year examination, given by a committee designated for the purpose, on material covered in statistics courses for first-year graduate students and (2) a final oral examination consisting of a presentation by the student on a statistical topic not covered in depth in the regular course work. The student should consult with his/her adviser to choose a topic, and present a written report on that topic to the supervisory committee at least 1 week before the examination date. A typical report is 8 to 10 pages. During and after the presentation, the student’s committee may ask questions related to the topic of the presentation and related to other material covered in the student’s program of study.

Requirements for Doctoral Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is a research degree and is granted on evidence of general proficiency, distinctive attainment in a special field, and particularly on ability for independent investigation as demonstrated in a dissertation presenting original research with a high degree of literary skill. Consequently, doctoral programs are more flexible and varied than those leading to other graduate degrees. The Graduate Council does not specify what courses are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. General requirements: The program should be unified in relation to a clear objective, the program should have the considered approval of the student’s entire supervisory committee, and the program should include an appropriate number of credits of doctoral research.

Course Requirements

Course requirements for doctoral degrees vary from field to field and from student to student. In all fields, the Ph.D. degree requires at least 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree. All master’s degrees counted in the minimum must be earned in the last 7 years.

Transfer of credit: No more than 30 credits of a master’s degree from another institution will be transferred to a doctoral program. If a student holds a master’s degree in a discipline different from the doctoral program, the master’s work will not be counted in the program unless the academic unit petitions the Dean of the Graduate School. All courses beyond the master’s degree taken at another university to be applied to the Ph.D. degree must be taken at an institution offering the doctoral degree and must be approved for graduate credit by the Graduate School of the University of Florida. All courses to be transferred must be graduate-level, letter-graded with a grade of B or better and must be demonstrated to relate directly to the degree being sought. All such transfer requests must be made by petition of the supervisory committee no later than the third term of Ph.D. study. The total number of credits (including 30 for a prior master’s degree) that may be transferred cannot exceed 45, and in all cases the student must complete the qualifying examination at the University of Florida. In addition, any prior graduate credits earned at UF (e.g., a master’s degree in the same or a different discipline) may be transferred into the doctoral program at the discretion of the supervisory committee and by petition to the Graduate School. The petition must show how the prior course work is relevant to the current degree.

Major: A Ph.D. student does the major work in an academic unit specifically approved for offering doctoral courses and supervising dissertations. See Graduate Programs. At least a B (3.00 truncated) is needed for courses included in the major.

Minor: With the supervisory committee’s approval, the student may choose one or more minor fields. Minor work may be completed in any academic unit outside the major if approved for master’s or doctoral programs listed in this catalog. The collective grade for courses included in a minor must be B (3.00 truncated) or higher.

If one minor is chosen, the supervisory committee member representing the minor suggests 12 to 24 credits of courses numbered 5000 or higher as preparation for a qualifying examination. Part of this credit may have been earned in the master’s program. If two minors are chosen, each must include at least 8 credits. Competence in the minor is demonstrated by written examination by the minor academic unit, or by the oral qualifying examination.

Minor course work at the doctoral level may include courses in more than one academic unit if the objective of the minor is clearly stated and the combination of courses is approved by the Graduate School (this approval is not required for a minor in one academic unit).

Leave of Absence

A doctoral student who ceases to be registered at UF for more than 1 term needs prior written approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence for a stated period of time. This approved leave is kept on file in the student’s departmental record. It does not need Graduate School approval. The student must reapply for admission on returning. See Readmission and Catalog Year.

Supervisory Committee

Supervisory committees are nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the dean of the college concerned, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student starts doctoral work and no later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-time study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees.

Duties and responsibilities of the supervisory committee:

  • Inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. This does not absolve the student from responsibility for being informed about these regulations. See General Regulations.
  • Meet immediately after appointment to review the student’s qualifications and discuss and approve a program of study.
  • Meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the plans for carrying it out.
  • Give the student a yearly evaluation letter in addition to S/U grades earned for research courses 7979 and 7980. The chair writes this letter after consulting with the supervisory committee.
  • Conduct the qualifying examination (or participate in it, if administered by the academic unit).
  • Meet when at least half the work on the dissertation is complete, to review procedure, progress, and expected results; and to make suggestions for completion.
  • Meet with the student when the dissertation is completed and conduct the final oral examination to assure that the dissertation is a piece of original research and a contribution to knowledge. The supervisory committee chair or cochair must be present with the candidate for the examination. All other committee members may attend remotely. Only the actual supervisory committee may sign the ETD Signature Page, and they must approve the dissertation unanimously. See Examinations in General Regulations.

Membership: The supervisory committee for a doctoral candidate comprises at least four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including the chair, must be from the academic unit recommending the degree. At least one member serves as external member and should be from a different educational discipline, with no ties to the home academic unit. One regular member may be from the home academic unit or another unit.

If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee includes at least one Graduate Faculty member representing the student’s minor. If the student elects more than one minor, each minor area must be represented on the supervisory committee. Therefore, committees for students with two minors must have a minimum of five members.

Special appointments: People without Graduate Faculty status may be made official members of a student’s supervisory committee through the special appointment process. Appropriate candidates for special appointments include

  • Individuals from outside UF with specific expertise who contribute to a graduate student’s program of study
  • Tenure-track faculty not yet qualified for Graduate Faculty status
  • Nontenure-track faculty or staff at UF who do not qualify for Graduate Faculty status

Limitations for special appointments:

  • They do not hold Graduate Faculty appointments
  • They have a special appointment that is specific only to an individual student’s committee
  • They may not serve as a supervisory committee chair, cochair, external member, or minor representative.

The student’s supervisory committee chair requests the special appointment, briefly explaining what the special appointment contributes to the supervisory committee. A special appointment is made for a specific supervisory committee. If a student changes to a new degree or major and the committee chair wishes to include the special member on the new supervisory committee, another request must be submitted to the Graduate School for the new committee.

External member:

  • Represents the interests of the Graduate School and UF
  • Knows Graduate Council policies
  • Serves as an advocate for the student at doctoral committee activities.

If the academic unit’s committee activity conflicts with broader University policies or practices, the external member is responsible for bringing such conflicts to the attention of the appropriate governing body. Therefore, the external member is prohibited from holding any official interest in the doctoral candidate’s major academic unit. Faculty holding joint, affiliate, courtesy, or adjunct appointments in the degree-granting academic unit cannot be external members on a student’s committee.

Minor member: The Graduate Faculty member who represents a minor on a student’s committee may be appointed as the external member if he/she does not have a courtesy graduate appointment in the student’s major academic unit.

Cochair: To substitute for the chair of the committee at any examinations, the cochair must be in the same academic unit as the candidate.

Retired faculty: Graduate Faculty members who retire may continue their service on supervisory committees for 1 year. With approval of the academic unit, retired faculty may continue serving on existing or new committees beyond this period.

Substituting members at qualifying and final examination: If a supervisory committee member cannot be present at the student’s final defense, a Graduate Faculty member in the same academic area may substitute for the absent committee member. The substitute should sign the Final Examination form on the left side, in the space provided for committee members, noting the name of the absent member.

The chair of the student’s major academic unit also must indicate the reason for the absence and state that the absent member agreed to this substitution at the final examination.

The substitute should not sign the ETD signature page. The original committee member must sign.

The student and chair or cochair should be present for the oral defense; however, other committee members may elect to attend remotely, with approval by the other committee members, using modern communication technology to be present rather than being physically present at the defense.

No substitutes are allowed for the chair or external member of the committee. Changes to the supervisory committee may be entered online in GIMS before the qualifying examination.

The Graduate Council wants each supervisory committee to function as a University committee (not a departmental committee), applying University-wide standards to the various doctoral degrees. For complete information on the appointment process, consult the Graduate Council Policy Manual, http://gradschool.ufl.edu/archived-files/policy-manual-archived-copy.html (Chapter VIII).

Language Requirement

Any foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is established by the major academic unit with approval of the college. The student should check with the graduate coordinator of the appropriate academic unit for specific information. The foreign language departments offer classes for graduate students starting to study a language. See the current Schedule of Courses for available languages. All candidates must be able to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee.

Campus Residence Requirement

Beyond the first 30 credits counted toward the doctoral degree, students must complete 30 credits enrolled at the University of Florida campus or at an approved branch station of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations or the Graduate Engineering and Research Center. An academic unit or college may establish and monitor its own more-stringent requirement as desired.

Qualifying Examination

All Ph.D. candidates must take the qualifying examination. It may be taken during the third term of graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree.

The student must be registered in the term the qualifying examination is given.

The examination, prepared and evaluated by the full supervisory committee or the major and minor academic units, is both written and oral and covers the major and minor subjects. Except for allowed substitutions, all members of the supervisory committee must attend the oral part. Using modern technological means, however, will allow them to attend remotely, should that be necessary. At this time the supervisory committee is responsible for deciding whether the student is qualified to continue work toward a Ph.D. degree.

If a student fails the qualifying examination, the Graduate School should be notified. A re-examination may be requested, but it must be recommended by the supervisory committee. At least one term of additional preparation is needed before re-examination.

Time lapse: Between the oral part of the qualifying examination and the date of the degree there must be at least 2 terms. The term the qualifying examination is passed is counted, if the examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.

Registration in Research Courses

Advanced Research (7979) is open to doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy (classified as 7 and 8). Students enrolled in 7979 during the term they qualify for candidacy will stay in this registration unless the academic unit elects to change their enrollment to Research for Doctoral Dissertation (7980), which is reserved for doctoral students admitted to candidacy (classified as 9).

Admission to Candidacy

A graduate student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degree when the student is granted formal admission to candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the student’s supervisory committee, the academic unit chair, the college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The approval must be based on

  • The academic record of the student
  • The supervisory committee’s opinion on overall fitness for candidacy
  • An approved dissertation topic
  • A qualifying examination as described above

The student should apply for admission to candidacy as soon as the qualifying examination is passed and a dissertation topic is approved by the student’s supervisory committee.

Dissertation

Each doctoral candidate must prepare and present a dissertation that shows independent investigation and that is acceptable in form and content to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, using the Graduate School’s format requirements. The student and supervisory committee are responsible for level of quality and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate School Editorial Office, as agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to review theses and dissertations for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as needed.

Doctoral dissertation requirements: Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the dissertation should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the dissertation, before attempting to make a first submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the ASC Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards, required for an editorial review

Format requirements: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/editorial-format.pdf

Format examples: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/format.html#samples

Checklist: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf

Graduate School Editorial Office: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html#contacts

Application Support Center: http://etd.circa.ufl.edu

Gatorlink e-mail requirement: UF requires all students to maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail.

Dissertation First Submission: Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the thesis should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the dissertation, before attempting to make submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards required for an editorial review

Should the document pass the submission requirements and appear acceptable for review, the Editorial Office will e-mail the student, using their Gatorlink email address, confirming the submission, and responding with an acceptance e-mail. Should the document not pass first submission requirements, a denial e-mail will instead be sent, advising the student of their options at that time.  This notice must be addressed immediately.  Once a successful first submission has been achieved and the document has been reviewed by one of the Graduate School’s editors, another e-mail is sent, providing editorial feedback to the student and committee chair.  The student is responsible for retrieving the dissertation, review comments, and resolving any deficits related to the format requirements. Students should promptly make all required changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf for Editorial Final Submission: After changes have been made to the satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page is submitted electronically, via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). This data is then transmitted to the Graduate School Editorial Office.  This must be completed by the Editorial Office’s Final Submission Deadline.  Once this form has been submitted, the student should upload and submit the final pdf of the electronic dissertation, using the Editorial Document Management (EDM) system.  Next, the document will undergo a final review by one of the Graduate School Representatives. The Editorial Office ensures that the format is acceptable, that all indicated changes were made, and that all of the hyperlinks work within the document. The Graduate School Representative then e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD (electronic thesis or dissertation). If accepted, no further changes are allowed to be made to the document.  If changes are still required, the student must satisfy all stipulations set by the Graduate School’s Editorial Office by the Final Clearance Deadline.  This deadline is firm, and no exceptions can be granted.  Therefore, if changes are necessitated, the student should resubmit the corrected document as soon as possible because all documents must be confirmed with final approval emails from the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Clearance Deadline. When all changes have been made and approved, the Editorial Office will email the Committee Chair and the student with a message, indicating the student has achieved Editorial Final Clearance status with the Graduate School’s Editorial Office.  

Editorial Final Clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final thesis must be confirmed as accepted, by email, by 5:00 p.m. on this deadline. This deadline only applies, if all other posted deadlines for the term have been appropriately met.  Because there are hundreds of students in this process, most students complete all requirements well in advance. 

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure they have achieved Final Clearance status by the Final Clearance Deadline for the term in which they intend to graduate. This can be confirmed via GIMS.

Publication of dissertation: All dissertation students must pay a $25 microfilm fee for traditional publication and microfilming fees through UMI/Proquest, even if they elect not to send the dissertation to UMI for publication. This charge will appear as a hold on the student record in ISIS after making first submission to the Graduate School Editorial Office. All dissertation students also must sign a microfilm agreement form. This form is provided to the student at the defense. This form is signed by the student; it is delivered to the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Submission Deadline for the intended term of degree award. Students who began their graduate program in Fall 2001 or later must submit their final dissertations electronically (not on paper).

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having written the dissertation. A copyright page should be included immediately after the title page to indicate this. The Editorial Office does not accept copyright registration requests. Registering copyright is not required and does not benefit most students. Any students who wish to register a copyright can do so themselves (http://www.copyright.gov).

Dissertation language: Dissertations must be written in English, except for students pursuing degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in these disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic language. A foreign language dissertation should have the Acknowledgments, Abstract, and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1 should also be in English.

Journal articles: Dissertations may include journal articles as chapters, if all copyright considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 should be a general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last chapter should be general conclusions, again tying everything together into a unified whole. Any chapter representing a journal article needs a footnote at the bottom of the first page of the chapter: “Reprinted with permission from … ” giving the source, just as it appears in the list of references. The dissertation should have only 1 abstract and 1 reference list.

Guidelines for Restriction on Release of Dissertations

Research performed at the University can effectively contribute to the education of our students and to the body of knowledge that is our heritage only if the results of the research are published freely and openly. Conflicts can develop when it is in the interests of sponsors of university research to restrict such publication. When such conflicts arise, the University must decide what compromises it is willing to accept, taking into account the relevant circumstances.

Final Examination

While submitting the dissertation and completing all other work prescribed for the degree, the candidate is given a final examination, oral or written or both, by the supervisory committee, on campus. The candidate and the supervisory committee chair or cochair must be physically present together at the same location. With approval of the entire committee, other members may attend the defense remotely, using modern communication technology.The defense should be no more than 6 months before degree award. All forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate and the supervisory committee chair sign the UF Publishing Agreement Form, while the entire supervisory committee signs the ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report. If dissertation changes are requested, the supervisory committee chair or his or her designee may hold the ETD Signature Page until all are satisfied with the dissertation. However, this form must be submitted electronically, via GIMS, by the Final Submission Deadline for the Graduate School Editorial Office, during the term of intended degree award.

Satisfactory performance on this examination and adherence to all Graduate School regulations outlined above complete the requirements for the degree.

Time limitation: All work for the doctorate must be completed within 5 calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must be repeated.

Doctor of Audiology

The College Public Health and Health Professions offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Audiology. The Au.D. degree is awarded after a 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not required. The program leading to the Au.D. degree is administered by the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, the college, and the Graduate School.

Admission: To be considered for the Au.D. program, students must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • A 3.00 junior-senior undergraduate grade point average and a program specific acceptable score on the GRE General Test,
  • Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of recommendation, and
  • Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through a personal statement describing the motivation and skills applicable to graduate study and the profession of audiology.

Course requirements include 125 credits for students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree awarded by an accredited institution consisting of  at least 70 credits of didactic instruction, 45 credits of applied practicum, and 3 credits of audiology research.

A 70-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned master’s degree in audiology from an accredited institution.

A 45-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned master’s from an accredited institution, certification and/or licensure in audiology, and at least 3 years of full-time experience in audiology.

Supervisory committee: Supervisory committees are nominated by the chair of the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, approved by the college dean and the dean of the Graduate School.

The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student starts the program and, in general, no later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-time study. The supervisory committee shall consist of no fewer than two members of the audiology Graduate Faculty.

Duties of the supervisory committee include curriculum planning for the student, annual evaluation of the student’s progress in the program including administration of the oral and written comprehensive examination in the third year of study, and determining successful completion of the audiology research project.

Comprehensive examination, required for all Au.D. candidates, may be taken during the eighth term of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. Both written and oral, this examination is prepared and evaluated by the supervisory committee, which is responsible for determining whether the student is qualified to continue work toward the degree by completing the clinical residency.

Doctor of Education

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree offers advanced professional training and academic preparation for the highest levels of educational practice. Programs are available in the School of Teaching and Learning, the School of Special Education, School Psychology, and Early Childhood Studies, and the School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education.

A minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree (master’s degrees included must be in the last 7 years) is required. Course requirements vary with the academic unit and with the student’s plan for research and/or professional pursuit. With the approval of the supervisory committee, the student may choose one or more minor fields of study. The Ed.D. requires a qualifying examination and a dissertation.

See Requirements for the Ph.D. for information on transfer of credit, minors, leave of absence, supervisory committee, language requirement, campus residence requirement, qualifying and final examinations, admission to candidacy, dissertation, and certification. These statements apply to both the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

The College of Nursing offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.). The program prepares advanced practice nurses with the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in today’s complex health care environment and produces advanced practice nurses with educational background comparable to health care practitioners in other fields.

Admission: To be considered for the D.N.P. program, students must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • A bachelor of science in nursing degree for the BSN/DNP program or a master’s degree in nursing for the post master’s DNP program
  • A GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • A score of 500 or higher on each of the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  • Completion of the GRE analytical section.
  • Current licensure (or eligibility) in the state of Florida

Program of study: The D.N.P. program consists of 93 credits that can be completed in 8 semesters of full-time study or 14 semesters of part-time study. Students who already have an M.S.N. degree are able to satisfy the requirements of the D.N.P. curriculum upon completion of 48 credits.

Doctor of Plant Medicine

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers an interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.). The D.P.M. degree is awarded after a 3- to 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not required. The program leading to the D.P. M. degree is administered by the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and the Graduate School.

Admission: Students must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • B.S. or B.A. degree, preferably in biological, agricultural, or health science.
  • A 3.00 grade point average in upper-division courses.
  • A program specific acceptable score on the GRE General Test.
  • Applicants from countries where English is not the native language must also achieve a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: paper=550, web= 80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute program.
  • Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of recommendation.
  • Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through personal statements briefly describing their backgrounds, reasons, and career goals for studying plant medicine.

Course requirements: Students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree must earn 120 credits. This includes at least 90 credits of course work and 30 credits of internship. Students entering the program with a master’s degree in a related area may be allowed to transfer up to 30 credits in graduate courses corresponding to those required by the plant medicine program.

Supervisory committee: The supervisory committee is selected by the student, nominated by the Director of the Plant Medicine Program, approved by the Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after starting the program and before midpoint of the student’s third term. Each supervisory committee must consist of three UF Graduate Faculty members: one each from entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science. The duties of the supervisory committee include planning elective courses and internships, helping to complete the program of study form (Form 2), evaluating elective internships, periodically evaluating the student’s progress in the program (a minimum of two supervisory committee meetings are required and the student should meet with the committee chair regularly and at the start of each semester), and administering the final oral comprehensive examination.

Comprehensive examination: Both written and oral comprehensive examinations are required of all D.P.M. students. The written examination has three sections: entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science. Faculty from the appropriate disciplines are appointed by the Program Director to develop and grade the final written examination, working in concert with faculty who teach courses required for the D.P.M. degree. The three sections of the written exam may be taken independently during the student’s last three semesters in the program at the discretion of the supervisory committee and after completion of all course work and internships. After a student passes all three sections of the final written examination (80% or higher is considered a passing grade), the supervisory committee administers an oral examination that tests the student’s ability to diagnose and manage plant health problems. A student who fails to pass a comprehensive examination may retake it within 3 months.

Specialized Degrees

Engineer

For those engineers who need additional technical depth and diversification in their education beyond the master’s degree, the College of Engineering offers the degree of Engineer (Eng.). This degree requires at least 30 credits of graduate work beyond the master’s degree. It is not to be considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D. degree. The student’s objective after the master’s degree should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer degree.

Admission to the program: Students must have completed a master’s degree in engineering and apply for admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida. The master’s degree is regarded as the foundation for the degree of Engineer. The master’s degree must be based on the candidate having a bachelor’s degree in engineering from an ABET-accredited curriculum or having taken sufficient articulation course work to meet the minimum requirements specified by ABET.

Course and residence requirements: Total registration in an approved program must include at least 30 graduate credits beyond the master’s degree. This minimum requirement must be earned through the University of Florida. The last 30 credits must be completed within 5 calendar years.

Supervisory committee: Each student admitted to the program needs a supervisory committee with at least 3 members of the Graduate Faculty (2 from the major academic unit, and at least 1 from a supporting academic unit). In addition, every effort should be made to have a representative from industry as an external adviser for the student’s program.
This committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to Graduate School and no later than the end of the second term of study.

This committee informs the student of all regulations pertaining to the degree program. The committee is nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.

The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. If a thesis or report is required, the committee will approve the proposed thesis or report and the plans for carrying it out. The thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School. The committee will also conduct the final examination on campus when the plan of study is completed.

Plan of study :Each plan of study is developed on an individual basis for each student. Thus, there are no specific requirements for the major or minor; each student is considered individually. If the plan of study includes a thesis, the student may register for 6 to 12 credits of 6972 (Research for Engineer’s Thesis).

Thesis: The thesis should represent performance at a level above that ordinarily associated with the master’s degree. It should clearly be an original contribution; this may take the form of scientific research, a design project, or an industrial project approved by the supervisory committee. Work on the thesis may be conducted in an industrial or governmental laboratory under conditions stipulated by the supervisory committee.

Final examination: After the student completes all work on the plan of study, the supervisory committee conducts a final comprehensive oral and/or written examination (for thesis students, this also involves defending the thesis).

Specialist in Education

An Ed.S. program develops competencies needed for a professional specialization. Specializations are offered in the School of Teaching and Learning, the School of Special Education, School Psychology, and Early Childhood Studies, and the School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education Ed.S. applicants must apply and be admitted to UF’s Graduate School. All work for the degree, including transferred credit, must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

The Ed.S. degree is awarded on completing a planned program with at least 72 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree or at least 36 credits beyond the master’s degree. All credits accepted for the program must contribute to the unity and the stated objective of the total program.

Students are tested (no more than 6 months before graduation) by written and oral examination. A thesis is not required; however, each program includes a research component relevant to the intended profession. With the academic unit’s approval, course work taken as part of the specialist program may count toward a doctoral degree.

Students who enter the program with an appropriate master’s degree from another accredited institution must complete at least 36 credits of post-master’s study to meet the following requirements:

  • At least 36 credits in graduate-level courses
  • At least 12 credits in graduate-level professional education courses

Students who enter the program with a bachelor’s degree only must (during the 72-credit program) meet these requirements in addition to the requirements of the Master of Education degree or its equivalent.

Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work, earned with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include no more than 9 credits from institution/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at UF. Credits transferred from other universities are applied toward meeting the degree requirements, but the grades earned are not computed in the student’s grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the student’s supervisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for the Ed.S. degree must be made during the student’s first term of enrollment in the Graduate School. The supervisory committee is responsible for basing acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established criteria for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.

Students are tested (no more than 6 months before graduation) by written and oral examination. A thesis is not required; however, each program includes a research component relevant to the intended profession. With the academic unit’s approval, course work taken as part of the specialist program may count toward a doctoral degree.

Students who enter the program with an appropriate master’s degree from another accredited institution must complete at least 36 credits of post-master’s study to meet the following requirements:

  • At least 36 credits in graduate-level courses
  • At least 12 credits in graduate-level professional education courses

Students who enter the program with a bachelor’s degree only must (during the 72-credit program) meet these requirements in addition to the requirements of the Master of Education degree or its equivalent.

Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work, earned with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include no more than 9 credits from institution/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at UF. Credits transferred from other universities are applied toward meeting the degree requirements, but the grades earned are not computed in the student’s grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the student’s supervisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for the Ed.S. degree must be made during the student’s first term of enrollment in the Graduate School. The supervisory committee is responsible for basing acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established criteria for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.

Nontraditional Programs

Concurrent Graduate Programs

Any student interested in pursuing two master’s degrees in two different programs or two master’s degrees in the same program concurrently should discuss the proposed study with Graduate Student Records (392-4643, 106 Grinter) before applying. Written approval is needed from each academic unit and the Graduate School Dean. The student must be officially admitted to both programs through regular procedures. No more than 9 credits from the first program may be applied toward the second. Contact the academic unit(s) for details.

Joint Degree Programs

A joint degree program leads to a graduate degree and a professional degree. Normally 12 credits of professional courses count toward the graduate degree and 12 credits of graduate courses count toward the professional degree. Individual academic units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate. Joint programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

To participate in a joint program, a student must be admitted to both programs. Enrollment in one program may precede enrollment in the other according to timelines set by the program. During the term the student is graduating, registration is required (at least 3 credits fall or spring, or 2 credits summer). This course work must be credit that applies toward the graduate degree requirements. See graduate coordinator for details.

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

UF offers a number of bachelor’s/master’s programs for superior students. In these programs, 12 credits of graduate-level courses are counted for both degrees. See Transfer of Credit for requirements. For admission requirements and available programs, contact the academic unit.

State University System Programs

Traveling Scholar program: By mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the home and host institutions, traveling scholars’ admission requirements are waived and their earned credits are guaranteed acceptance. Traveling scholars are normally limited to 1 term on the host campus, and it cannot be their final term. The program offers special resources on another campus that are not available on the student’s home campus. To participate, graduate students need prior approval from their graduate coordinator, their supervisory committee chair, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Interested students should contact Graduate Student Records, 106 Grinter Hall.

Cooperative degree programs: In certain degree programs, faculty from other universities in the State University System hold Graduate Faculty status at UF. In those approved areas, the intellectual resources of these Graduate Faculty members are available to students at UF.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificates and Concentrations

A number of graduate programs offer interdisciplinary enhancements in the form of concentrations, field research, or graduate certificates. Those approved by the Graduate Council are summarized on the next pages.

African Studies

Director and Graduate Coordinator: L. Villalon.

The Center for African Studies, a National Resource Center on Africa (funded partly by Title VI of the Higher Education Act), directs and coordinates interdisciplinary instruction, research, and outreach related to Africa. In cooperation with participating academic units throughout the University, the Center offers a Certificate in African Studies for master’s and doctoral students. The curriculum provides a broad foundation for students preparing for teaching or other professional careers requiring knowledge of Africa.

The Center offers the Certificate in African Studies for master’s and doctoral students in conjunction with disciplinary degrees. Graduate courses on Africa or with African content are available in the Colleges, Schools, or Departments of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Anthropology, Art and Art History, Botany, Economics, Education, English, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, History, Journalism and Communications, Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science, and Sociology. The Certificate Program in African Studies is described in the Special Programs section of this catalog. Course offerings are listed by academic unit in this catalog, or may be obtained from the Director, 427 Grinter Hall.

Courses

Graduate fellowships and assistantships: Students pursuing degrees in participating academic units can compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships. Extracurricular activities: The Center for African Studies sponsors the annual Carter Lectures on Africa on a given theme, a weekly colloquium series (BARAZA) with invited speakers, an African film series, and periodic brown bag discussions. Other conferences and lectures, and performances and art exhibits in conjunction with other campus units, are held throughout the academic year. The Center also directs an extensive outreach program addressed to public schools, community colleges, and universities nationwide.

Library resources: The Center for African Studies gives direct support for African library acquisitions to meet the instructional and research needs of its faculty and students. The Africana Collection exceeds 120,000 volumes and 500 periodicals. The Map Library has 360,000 maps and 165,000 serial photographs and satellite images and is among the top five academic African map libraries in the U.S.

Graduate certificate program: The Center for African Studies, cooperating with participating academic units, offers a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction with the master’s and doctoral degrees.

For more information about the various programs and activities of the Center, contact the Director, Center for African Studies, 427 Grinter Hall, website http://www.africa.ufl.edu.

Agroforestry

The agroforestry interdisciplinary concentration is administered through the School of Forest Resources and Conservation. It offers facilities for interdisciplinary graduate education (M.S., Ph.D.) by combining course work and research around a thematic field focusing on agroforestry, especially in the context of tropical land use. Students seeking admission to the concentration need a degree in a relevant field such as agronomy, forestry, horticulture, soil science, or social sciences. They should apply to the School of Forest Resources and Conservation or another academic unit that closely represents their background and interest. Course work may be chosen from several related disciplines. Thesis research can be undertaken in Florida or overseas. Degrees are awarded through the academic units the candidates are enrolled in.

In conjunction with the graduate degree, a student can earn a concentration or minor in agroforestry by fulfilling certain requirements. Students who have a primary interest in agroforestry and undertake graduate research on an agroforestry topic can seek the concentration. Those who have an active interest and some training in agroforestry, but do not conduct graduate research on an agroforestry topic, can earn a minor. Candidates meeting the requirements can have Concentration in Agroforestry or Minor in Agroforestry appear on their transcripts.

Each option requires completing FNR 5335 (Agroforestry) and an appropriate number of approved supporting courses. These courses should be distributed over at least two academic units outside the major to prepare the student to function in multidisciplinary teams and to associate with professionals from other disciplines. Students whose background is in biology are encouraged to take social science courses, and vice versa.

For a student with a concentration or minor in agroforestry, at least one member of the supervisory committee should represent agroforestry. The Agroforestry Program Advisory Committee requires this member to counsel the student on selecting courses and the research topic.

For more information, contact the Agroforestry Program Leader, 330 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Phone (352) 846-0880, Fax (352) 846-1277, E-mail pknair@ufl.edu.

Animal Molecular and Cell Biology

The interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular and cell biology (AMCB) gives graduate students in the animal and veterinary sciences an understanding of principles of molecular and cell biology as applied to animal health and production. It emphasizes participation in molecular and cell biology research and provides an intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines. Graduate Faculty from the Departments of Animal Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, and the College of Veterinary Medicine participate in the program. The AMCB gives graduate students access to the diverse research facilities needed to study cellular and molecular biology, reproductive biology, virology, immunology, and endocrinology. Facilities exist for recombinant DNA research, experimental surgery, in vitro culture of cells, tissue and organ explants, embryo manipulation, vaccine production, and recombinant protein engineering.

Ph.D. degrees are awarded by participating academic units, with an interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular and cell biology. Applicants need a strong background in animal or veterinary sciences. Graduate degree programs are designed by each student’s supervisory committee, headed by the member who represents AMCB. All students must complete a core curriculum, may obtain cross-disciplinary training through rotations in laboratories of participating faculty, and may participate in the AMCB seminar series.

Requirements for admission to AMCB are the same as for the faculty adviser’s academic unit and college. Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available from sources in individual academic units and the AMCB. For more information, contact Dr. Peter J. Hansen, Department of Animal Sciences, pjhansen@ufl.edu.

Biological Sciences

The Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research conducts research on all aspects of the biology of sea turtles. Researchers at the Center for Sea Turtle Research, collaborating with students and faculty of various academic units, take a multidisciplinary approach to address the complex problems of sea turtle biology and conservation. Scientists from the Center have investigated questions of sea turtle biology around the world, from the molecular level to the ecosystem level, from studies of population structure based on mitochondrial DNA to the effects of ocean circulation patterns on the movements and distribution of sea turtles. Long-term field studies of the Center are conducted mainly at two research stations in the Bahamas and the Azores. For more information, contact the Director, Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research, 223 Bartram Hall, Phone (352) 392-5194, Website http://accstr.ufl.edu.

The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience is a UF research center for biomedical research and biotechnology. Founded in 1974, the Whitney Lab is dedicated to using marine model animals for studying fundamental problems in biology and applying that knowledge to issues of human health, natural resources, and the environment.

The academic staff of the Whitney Laboratory consists of 10 tenure-track and 2 nontenure-track faculty members, together with 50 associates, students, and visiting scientists. Dr. Peter A. V. Anderson is the director.

Fields of research conducted at the Whitney Laboratory include chemosensory and visual physiology and biochemistry, neural pattern generators, ion channel structure and function, neurogenomics, synaptogenesis and synaptic physiology, protein-lipid interactions, physiology and evolution of neurotransmitter pathways, membrane pumps and transporters, and regulation of ciliary mechanisms. This research uses the techniques of modern cell and molecular biology, for which the Laboratory is particularly well equipped and recognized.

Research at Whitney Laboratory attracts graduate students and scientists from all over the United States and abroad. Students enroll in the graduate programs of academic units on campus and complete their course work before moving to the Whitney Laboratory, where they conduct their dissertation research under the supervision of resident faculty. An NSF undergraduate research training program at the Whitney Laboratory is also available for 10-week periods.

The Laboratory is situated on a narrow barrier island with both the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway within a few hundred feet of the facility. It is located in Marineland, about 18 miles south of St. Augustine and 80 miles from Gainesville.

For more information, contact the Director, Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, 9505 Ocean Shore Blvd, St. Augustine FL 32080-8610, Phone (904) 461-4000; Fax (904) 461-4008; Website http://www.whitney.ufl.edu.

The UF Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is a field station providing (a) support for research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists; (b) an outstanding teaching program in marine related subjects; and (c) support from public education related to marine, estuarine, and coastal resources of Florida. Seahorse Key is 57 miles west of Gainesville on the Gulf Coast, 3 miles offshore and opposite Cedar Key. Facilities include a research vessel, several smaller outboard-powered boats for shallow water and inshore work, a 20 x 40 foot research and teaching building, and a 10-room residence, with 2 kitchens, a dining lounge, and dormitory accommodations for 24 persons.

Chemical Physics

The Center for Chemical Physics, with participating faculty from the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Chemical Engineering, is concerned with graduate education and research in the theoretical, experimental, and computational aspects of problems in the borderline between chemistry and physics. Graduate students join one of the above academic units and follow a special curriculum. The student receives a Ph.D. degree and a Certificate in Chemical Physics. For information, contact the Director, Dr. Valeria Kleiman, 311A Chemistry Laboratory Building, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville FL 32611, E-mail kleiman@chem.ufl.edu.

Clinical and Translational Science

The Clinical & Translational Science training program of the UF CTSI provides clinical and translational research training for pre-doctoral students performing research in health-related fields at UF using a team science approach. This program is part of the fully integrated approach of the UF CTSI to advance education and career development by early identification,recruitment, and training of a critical mass of multidisciplinary, clinical and translational investigators working to improve human health. The program is intended to increase motivation of graduate students for selection into health-relevant multidisciplinary clinical and translational research careers among the participating students.  The Clinical and Translational Science program is aligned with the focus of the NIH on translational research to bridge the gap between basic science and  improved human health, and is supported in part by the UF Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA). Trainees will develop skill sets to lead and participate effectively in team oriented translational science. Participation in the program will give scholars an advantage in preparing for successful careers in a variety of settings, including academia, industry, biotech, and government. The UF CTSI exists to enhance the ability of the University of Florida to develop new therapies, test those therapies in real-world settings, promote therapies found to be of value, and continuously evaluate the effectiveness of therapies. In this context, a “therapy” can be any approach to bettering human health–from lifestyle changes to genetic interventions, from drug discovery to public health.

Find out more here:
https://www.ctsi.ufl.edu/ or for additional information about the UF CTSI, please call 352-273-8700 or email info@ctsi.ufl.edu

Ecological Engineering

The Graduate Certificate in Ecological Engineering is for graduate engineering students wishing to develop expertise in ecological solutions to engineering problems. Students interested in the certificate must apply for admission through the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. The certificate program is open to individuals in any graduate program who hold an undergraduate engineering degree, or who complete the additional undergraduate engineering articulation courses needed to bring the student’s background to the minimum level required for engineers by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

The certificate program consists of 15 course credits, and a research project with content materially related to some aspect of ecological engineering. If appropriate, the 15 credits of graduate course work may count toward the minimum requirements for the graduate degree. The student’s terminal project, master’s thesis, or individual studies project may satisfy the ecological engineering project requirement. For more information, contact the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, P.O. Box 116450, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-8450.

Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) revolutionized the way land features are located, measured, inventoried, managed, planned, and studied. GIS provides theories and methods for measuring location and topography, physical and biological attributes, and distribution of cultural components through data storage, analysis, modeling, mapping, and data display.

GIS applications are diverse. They include determining the suitability of land for different uses, planning future land uses, setting cadastral boundaries for the purpose of property recognition and taxation and regulation, analyzing land and land-cover for both resource inventories and scientific studies, and siting commercial enterprises.

Users and producers of GIS include engineers, geographers, planners, biologists and ecologists, land resource managers, archaeologists, sociologists, public health professionals, medical researchers, property tax assessors, law enforcement officers, land-development companies, utility companies,  and retail stores. Undergraduate and graduate students who learn to use GIS technology are in high demand and so start at higher salaries than their non-GIS peers. As a result the GIS community at the University of Florida developed the Interdisciplinary Concentration for Geographic Information Systems (ICGIS).

The ICGIS integrates existing GIS resources on campus, for graduate students, in response to changing regulatory environments in institutions and governments at all levels. This concentration established a standard set of courses and activities that allow graduate students to become experts in creating, studying, and using geographic information. Such graduates are in strong positions to meet future regulatory requirements for certification as professionals. Structurally, the ICGIS established a five-category curriculum within the standard M.S., M.A., M.E., or Ph.D. requirements. Completing the GIS concentration is officially recognized by statements on transcripts and a certificate.

For more information, contact Dr. Scot E. Smith, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110565, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-4990 , E-mail sesmith@ifas.ufl.edu

Graduate Certificate in Geriatric Care Management

The Geriatric Care Management Graduate Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of today’s working professionals. The program requires the successful completion of four graduate level courses with a grade of B or higher as well as a 50-hour supervised clinical experience to be completed in the area in which the student resides. The courses associated with this program are offered on a semester basis (Spring, Summer and Fall) and each semester is thirteen weeks in length.

All courses are taught utilizing a web based e-learning system. The courses are organized in weekly modules which include audio power point presentations, video lectures, assigned reading and on-line discussion forums. The material is designed to be completed in self paced / flexible format. Each course utilizes an electronic discussion board that provides an in depth interactive experience while at the same time offering individual flexibility to the working professional student.

The final requirement for the Graduate level certificate is the supervised clinical experience. Depending upon the individual professional background most students are required to complete a supervised clinical experience under the supervision of a professional practicing in the field of geriatric care management. If you are already employed as a professional geriatric care manager you may be able (based on your individual background) to waive this requirement. For further information, please contact UF - GCM Program via an e-mail to gcmsupport@dce.ufl.edu.

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

Director and Graduate Coordinator: P.A. Kricos

The Center for Gerontological Studies offers the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology for master’s, specialist, and doctoral students, which is completed in conjunction with their graduate degree programs. A partial listing of programs, departments, or colleges includes Nursing, Psychology, Clinical and Health Psychology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Counseling, Sociology, Exercise and Sport Sciences, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Audiology, and Recreation, Parks, and Tourism. Students may also minor in gerontology at the master’s or doctoral level. The Center affords students in many disciplines the opportunity to concentrate in gerontology through training that incorporates multidisciplinary instruction, field experience, and research. More information is available at http://www.geron.ufl.edu. Questions may be e-mailed to info@geron.ufl.edu.

In addition to those listed below, courses with aging content are offered by affiliated faculty and listed in their primary departments. A list of approved courses for the certificate or minor may be found at http://www.geron.ufl.edu/appcours.htm.

Courses

Historic Preservation

Historic preservation is the safeguarding of all cultural heritage: tangible and intangible. The College of Design, Construction, and Planning offers an interdisciplinary opportunity to study for the profession through multiple fields including archeology, architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, interior design, building construction, museum studies, law, and cultural tourism.  The master’s degree course work is practical and technical in scope and includes the study of history, research techniques, traditional crafts, materials conservation, documentation, interpretation, cultural research management, housing, urban rejuvenation and adaptive use of historic structures, restoration methodologies, economics, green design and sustainable/livable communities.

The 21st century offers significant expansion of the field of heritage conservation to address smart growth, sustainability, and economic development initiatives. Many related jobs exist, including preservation consultant, preservation contractor, preservation researcher, Main Street program director, site manager, lawyer, archeologist, cultural resource manager, historian, real estate professional, and policy administrator.

The College offers several nationally recognized field schools or practica: Preservation Institute: Nantucket, Traditional Crafts Field School, and the National Historic Landmarks District in Saint Augustine, America’s oldest city.

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation (ICCHP) integrates resources throughout UF to address the diverse topics relevant to the field. Thus, the ICCHP establishes a set of courses that allow graduate students to gain expertise in researching and applying historic preservation in the United States and abroad. Depending on the student’s career goals and background, this can include recognizing, documenting, and protecting historic structures and sites; rehabilitation and restoration technologies; and exploring emerging and related specializations such as community development and sustainable development.

The interdisciplinary curriculum structure draws on course work providing 12 credits for master’s students and 15 credits for Ph.D. students specializing in historic preservation. The concentration is officially recognized by statements on the transcript and by a certificate.

For more information, contact Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA, Bienecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor, Director of Historic Preservation Programs, University of Florida, P.O. Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352)392-0205, ext. 233, E-mail regraham@ufl.edu.

The University of Florida College of Design, Construction and Planning offers a Master of Historic Preservation degree using an interdisciplinary variety of coursework in the basic and applied skills and arts of historic preservation, anthropology, archeology, architecture, building construction, cultural tourism, history, interior design, landscape architecture, museum studies, and urban and regional planning. The coursework totals 42 hours. Students must take 12 hours of core courses, 6 hours of pre-approved history electives, and may choose from pre-approved and specially approved electives from across the campus. A true thesis to meet Graduate Requirements relating to historic preservation is required.

Program of Study

The Master of Historic Preservation degree program promotes interdisciplinary thinking in historic preservation by combining (1) required coursework in history and theory, research, documentation and recording historic sites, conservation of building materials and systems, and practica or other practical experience with (2) two courses in the history of the designed environment (including, for example architecture, urban development, landscape architecture, archeology, or material culture.) with (3) electives from a list of courses identified by the faculty, in the subject areas of resource-related studies including design issues, neighborhood issues (zoning, strategic planning, housing and social aspects of real estate development) historic and cultural landscape issues, historic interior issues, economic issues (marketing principles, private and public finance, property management and budget preparation), legal issues (Constitutional law, preservation case law, federal, state and local regulatory legislation and administration) sustainability issues traditional building crafts and curatorial issues (site development interpretation, management and cultural tourism). A true thesis that meets Graduate Requirements on an approved historic preservation topic is also required.

For more information contact
Kay Williams, FASLA
Graduate Coordinator
352-392-6098 ext. 326

Becky Hudson
Program Assistant
352-392-0205 ext. 202

Hydrologic Sciences

Interdisciplinary graduate studies in hydrologic sciences are for science and engineering students seeking advanced training in diverse aspects of water quantity and quality, and water-use issues. This concentration emphasizes (1) understanding the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring over broad spatial and temporal scales; and (2) skills in hydrologic policy and management based on a strong background in natural and social sciences and engineering.

Graduate Faculty from nine departments in three colleges contribute to this interdisciplinary concentration. Depending on academic background and research interests, students may earn a degree in any one of the following departments: Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Civil and Coastal Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Horticultural Sciences, and Soil and Water Science.

M.S. (thesis and non-thesis option) and Ph.D. studies are available. Interdisciplinary graduate requirements recognize diversity in the academic backgrounds and professional goals of the students. A core curriculum (12 credits for M.S.; 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides broad training in five topics: hydrologic systems, hydrologic chemistry, hydrologic biology, hydrologic techniques and analysis, and hydrologic policy and management. Additional elective courses (11 to 14 credits for M.S.; 30 credits for Ph.D.) allow specialization in one or more of these topics. Research projects involving faculty from several academic units can provide the basis for thesis and dissertation research topics.

Assistantships supported by extramural grants are available. Tuition waivers may be available to students who qualify. Students with B.S. or M.S. degrees in any of the following disciplines are encouraged to consider this specialization in their graduate program: engineering (agricultural, chemical, civil, environmental); natural sciences (physics, biology, chemistry); social sciences (agricultural and resource economics); forestry; and earth sciences (geography, geology, soil and water science).

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Newman, UF Water Institute, P.O. Box 116601, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-5893, E-mail markn@ufl.edu; or visit the Hydrologic Sciences Academic Cluster website (http://www.hydrology.ufl.edu).

Latin American Studies

Founded in 1930, the UF Center for Latin American Studies is the oldest in the U.S. and remains a premier institution. It offers interdisciplinary teaching and research programs focused on Latin America and the Caribbean. The M.A. program draws on 20 center-based Graduate Faculty and more than 160 faculty affiliates who teach courses or carry out research related to Latin America.

Master of Arts degree in Latin American Studies: This M.A. degree requires a thesis and 30 credits, including a 15 credit specialization in either a discipline or a topic.

Discipline specializations emphasize training and research in area and language studies in a specific academic unit, such as Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole), or Sociology. This option is especially suited to students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in a related discipline.

Topical specializations cluster course work and research around a thematic field focusing on contemporary Latin American problems, such as Andean studies, Brazilian studies, Caribbean studies, development, gender studies, international communications, Latin American business environment, Latino studies, religion and society, and tropical conservation and development. This option prepares students for technical and professional work related to Latin America and the Caribbean.

Additional requirements for both options are as follows:

  • 2 required gateway seminars: LAS 6220, Issues and Perspectives in Latin American Studies and LAS 6293, Design and Methods of Research in Latin American Studies; ideally, both seminars are taken in the first semester;
  • 9 credits of Latin American area or language courses outside the specialization; and
  • Intermediate proficiency in Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole; and
  • An interdisciplinary thesis on a Latin American topic.

Although the M.A. degree in Latin American studies is a terminal degree, many past recipients have entered the Ph.D. programs in related disciplines preparing for university teaching and research careers. Other graduates are employed in the Foreign Service, educational and research institutions, international organizations, government or nonprofit agencies, and private companies in the United States and Latin America.

Requirements for admission to the program are:

  • A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university;
  • Grade point average of at least 3.2 for all upper-division undergraduate work;
  • Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination;
  • For international students, a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web=80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77), or successful completion of the UF English Language Institute Program;
  • Basic knowledge of either Spanish or Portuguese; some Latin American course work.

Juris Doctor/Master of Arts program: This joint degree culminates in the Juris Doctor degree awarded by the College of Law and the Master of Arts degree in Latin American studies awarded by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The joint degrees can be completed in four years rather than the five years required if earning each degree separately.

Candidates for the joint program must be admitted to both academic units. See Requirements for Master’s Degrees for admission criteria for the M.A. program. Contact the College of Law for J.D. requirements. For more information, contact Dr. Richmond Brown, Center for Latin American Studies (rfbrown@latam.ufl.edu).

Graduate Certificates in Latin American Studies: Graduate students may earn a Certificate in Latin American Studies along with a degree from the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences; Business Administration; Design, Construction, and Planning; Education; Fine Arts; Journalism and Communications; Law; or Liberal Arts and Sciences.

M.A. thesis or Ph.D. students need at least 12 credits of Latin American course work distributed as follows:

  • 3 credits of LAS 6938;
  • At least 3 credits of Latin American course work in one academic unit outside the major;
  • 6 credits of courses with Latin American content within the major (to the extent possible);
  • Intermediate proficiency in a Latin American language (language courses at the 3000 level or higher count toward the certificate); and
  • a thesis or dissertation on a Latin American topic.

Non-thesis master’s degree candidates must have at least 15 credits of Latin American course work distributed as follows:

  • 3 credits of LAS 6938;
  • At least 6 credits of Latin American courses in an academic unit or units outside the major;
  • 6 credits of courses with Latin American content within the major (to the extent possible); and
  • intermediate proficiency in a Latin American language. For more information, see http://www.latam.ufl.edu/academic/programs

Financial support: The Center for Latin American Studies provides several graduate assistantships and academic year and summer FLAS fellowships for Portuguese, Haitian Creole, and/or Garifuna. The Center also provides substantial financial support for UF graduate students pursuing research in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latino Studies.

Research: Several research and training programs provide opportunities and financial support for graduate students, especially in the Amazon, the Andes, and the Caribbean.

Library resources: The Latin American Collection of the UF libraries holds more than 400,000 volumes of printed works and manuscripts, maps, and microforms and more than 1,000 serial titles dealing with Latin America and the Caribbean. All areas are well-represented but particular strengths are on Brazil and the Caribbean. UF’s Caribbean Collection is the largest in the world.

Other activities: The Center for Latin American Studies sponsors conferences, colloquia, and cultural events; supports publication of scholarly works; provides educational outreach service; and cooperates with other campus units in overseas research and training activities. The Center also administers summer programs in Brazil and Mexico.

For more information on the Center’s programs and activities, contact the Center’s Associate Director for Academic Programs and Student Affairs, Dr. Richmond Brown, 319F Grinter Hall, E-mail rfbrown@latam.ufl.edu, Phone (352) 392-0375, ext 807.

Medical Physics

Medical Physics applies advanced physical energy concepts and methods to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Students enroll in the Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and take courses taught by the medical physics faculty from Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiology, and Radiation Oncology. Students interested in the radiation protection aspects of applications of radioactivity or radiation in the healing arts may enroll in the medical health physics option. Formal courses include academic unit core requirements, a radiation biology course, and a block of clinical medical physics courses taught by Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiology, and Radiation Oncology faculty. The program also includes clinical internships in the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology. Research opportunities and financial support exist in the form of faculty research and projects related to patient care.

Modern European Studies

The Center for European Studies, a National Resource Center on Europe (funded partly by Title VI of the Higher Education Act), directs and coordinates interdisciplinary instruction, research, and outreach related to Europe. In cooperation with participating academic units throughout the University, the Center offers a Certificate in Modern European Studies for master’s and doctoral students. The curriculum provides a broad foundation for students preparing for teaching or other professional careers requiring knowledge of Europe.

Graduate fellowships and assistantships: Students pursuing degrees in participating academic units can compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships.

Extracurricular activities: The Center for European Studies sponsors various conferences, lectures, film series, performances, and art exhibits in conjunction with other campus units. The Center also directs an extensive outreach program addressed to public schools, local community, as well as business groups.

Library resources: The Center for European Studies gives direct support for European library acquisitions to meet the instructional and research needs of its faculty and students.

Graduate certificate program: The Center for European Studies, cooperating with participating academic units, offers a Certificate in Modern European Studies in conjunction with the master’s and doctoral degrees. To obtain the Certificate, students at the master’s level need to complete 13 credit hours and students at the doctoral level need to complete 16 credit hours of courses with European content. Both master’s and doctoral students are required to complete a 1-unit EUS 6005: Introduction to European Studies course. Given the critical role of languages to the comprehensive study of Europe all certificate recipients are required to complete at least one year of training at the 2000 level or above in at least one European language. However, in accordance with Graduate School regulations no language courses below the 3000 level will be included within the certificate program itself. Those students with a high level of language training, however, may count up to a maximum of two language courses at the 3000 level or higher towards the completion of the Certificate in Modern European Studies. In all cases students must complete at least 9 credit hours of course work outside their home department or unit.

For more information about the various programs and activities of the Center, contact the Director, Center for European Studies, 3324 Turlington Hall, Website http://www.ces.ufl.edu.

Quantitative Finance

The interdisciplinary concentration in quantitative finance trains students for academic and research positions in quantitative finance, and risk management. It gives graduates an edge in the job market by providing substantial expertise in key related disciplines: finance, operations research, statistics, mathematics, and software development. It is focused in teaching and research on design, development, and implementing new financial and risk management products, processes, strategies, and systems to meet demands of various institutions, corporations, governments, and households. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary approach requiring knowledge in finance, economics, mathematics, probability/statistics, operations research, engineering, and computer science.

Four academic units participate in this interdisciplinary concentration: Industrial and Systems Engineering (College of Engineering), Mathematics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), Statistics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate (College of Business Administration). To be eligible, a student must be admitted to a Ph.D. program in one of these participating academic units. Students seeking admission to the concentration need strong quantitative skills and a degree in one of the relevant fields such as finance, engineering, statistics, or mathematics. Students with a background in several disciplines are welcome. Application should be submitted to one of the participating academic units.

Each student takes basic courses and meets the home academic unit’s Ph.D. requirements. The student also takes approved courses in the other participating academic units to meet the requirements of the concentration.

Dissertation research is conducted in quantitative finance, risk management, and relevant areas involving quantitative finance approaches. The student receives a Ph.D. degree and a Certificate in Quantitative Finance.

Activities of the Ph.D. concentration in quantitative finance are supported by the Risk Management and Financial Engineering Laboratory (RMFE Lab), http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe. The RMFE Lab facilitates research and applications in the area of risk management and financial mathematics/engineering, including organizing research meetings, seminars, and conferences. It provides a basis for the collaborative efforts of multidisciplinary teams of UF researchers, governmental institutions, and industrial partners. For details, visit http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe/qf.

Quantum Theory Project (QTP)

QTP is an interdisciplinary group of 12 faculty plus graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and staff in the Departments of Physics and Chemistry. The computationally oriented theoretical research investigates electronic structure, conformation, properties, and dynamics of molecules and materials. The work covers large areas of modern chemistry, condensed matter and materials physics, and molecular biology. Essentially all the effort is supported by substantial extramural funding, both individual and collaborative. QTP operates the J. C. Slater Computer Laboratory to support large-scale computing for precise numerical solutions and simulations, plus graphics and visualization. Since 1960, the Institute has organized a major international meeting, the annual Sanibel Symposium.

Graduate students in chemistry and in physics are eligible for this specialization and follow a special curriculum. For more information, contact the Director, Quantum Theory Project, E-mail director@gtp.ufl.edu, P.O. Box 118435 (New Physics Building); or visit the QTP website http://www.qtp.ufl.edu.

Sustainable Architecture

The Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Architecture is for architecture graduate students (in the M.Arch. or M.S.A.S. program) seeking advanced courses on a wide range of topics related to sustainable architecture. The concentration in sustainable architecture supports detailed rigorous study in specific areas of expertise. Furthermore, the program requirements recognize the inherent diversity of academic backgrounds and professional goals of the students. Thus, there is flexibility in the selection of a suite of courses, while maintaining exposure to the multidisciplinary subject matter of sustainable architecture. This essential feature of the program allows students to develop individualized yet focused plans of study. Students select from a variety of approved courses offered in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning (the School of Architecture, the School of Building Construction, the Department of Interior Design, the Department of Landscape Architecture, and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning); and in other colleges in the University. Course work may include the following sustainability issues.

  • Architectural design and preventing environmental degradation: protecting ecosystems, fauna and flora, energy consumption, energy conservation, architectural commissioning, maintenance, water consumption, land use, and materials selection (resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)
  • Providing healthy architectural environments: indoor air environmental quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and landscapes
  • Responsive and responsible building design and construction: environmentally responsive architecture, and environmentally responsible architecture
  • Sustainable architectural and environment theory: the philosophy of sustainable design, ecological theory, sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and systems theory
  • Enhancing the community environment: historic preservation, sustainable developments, community and neighborhood design, regional design, and systems theory
  • Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction, and reconstruction.

Students enrolled in the Concentration and Certificate Program in Sustainable Architecture must complete at least 12 credits of approved sustainable architecture electives. Students must complete at least 6 credits within the School of Architecture; and at least one approved 3 credit course from outside the School of Architecture. Students also must complete a research project or thesis on a subject pre-approved by the concentration’s Governing Board, related to sustainable architecture. For more information, contact the Graduate Program Assistant, School of Architecture, University of Florida, Box 115702, Gainesville FL 32611-5702, Phone (352) 392-0205 ext. 202, E-mail bhuds@ufl.edu

Sustainable Design

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Design (ICSD) is for master’s-level students in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning. This concentration allows students to become proficient in one or more of the following areas: sustainable architecture, sustainable construction, sustainable interior design, sustainable landscape architecture, or sustainable urban planning. Course work deals with the following issues.

  • Preventing environmental degradation: protecting ecosystems, fauna and flora, energy conservation, energy consumption, architectural commissioning, maintenance, water consumption, land use, site selection, and materials selection (resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)
  • Providing healthy environments: indoor air environmental quality, outdoor environmental quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and landscapes
  • Responsive and responsible building construction: construction impacts on sites, environmentally responsive architecture, environmentally responsible architecture (preventing environmental degradation), and designing sustainable building components
  • Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction, reconstruction, and historic preservation
  • Enhancing the community environment: sustainable developments, community and neighborhood design, regional design, and city planning design
  • Environmental theory: the philosophy of sustainable design, ecological theory, sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and systems theory.

Students wishing to participate in the ICSD should notify their department or school as early in the graduate program as possible. To participate in the ICSD, a student must be admitted and enrolled in one of the departments participating in the ICSD. Students will complete the concentration for either the master’s degree or Master of Science degree, but not for both degrees if awarded from the University of Florida. Students cannot enroll in two concentration programs at the same time.

To successfully complete the ICSD, the student must earn 12 credit hours in sustainable design research and course work from a list of recommended courses. To satisfy the interdisciplinary intent of the ICSD, the student must take one of the approved 3 credit courses outside their home department or school, but within the College of Design, Construction, and Planning; and at least one approved 3 credit course from another college of the University. For more information, contact the Dean’s Office in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, University of Florida, Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, Telephone (352) 392-4836.

Toxicology

The Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology serves as the focal point for activities concerning the effects of chemicals on human and animal health. The Center’s affiliated faculty includes 20 to 30 scientists and clinicians interested in elucidating the mechanisms of chemical-induced toxicity, and is drawn from the Colleges of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions, Engineering, and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The broadly based, interdisciplinary expertise provided by this faculty is also used to address complex issues related to protecting public health and the environment.

Students who wish to receive graduate training in interdisciplinary toxicology leading to a Ph.D. enroll through one of the participating graduate programs. The number of graduate programs involved in interdisciplinary toxicology, and the variety of perspectives provided by their disciplines, allows a great deal of flexibility in providing a plan of graduate study to meet an individual student’s interests and goals in toxicology. Student course work and dissertation research are guided by the Center’s researchers and affiliated faculty who are also Graduate Faculty members in the student’s major academic unit. Dissertation research may be conducted either in the student’s academic unit, or at the Toxicology Laboratory facilities, at the Center. For more information, please write to the Director, Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, P.O. Box 110885, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; or visit their website (http://toxicology.ufl.edu).

Transnational and Global Studies

The Transnational and Global Studies Center (TGSC) is one of several federally funded centers on campus. The TGSC is a National Resource Center created in 2003 through funding from the U.S. Department of Education. It is part of a Florida-wide consortium of universities, the Florida Network for Global Studies. The TGSC is housed in the International Center but has affiliated faculty from the entire campus. The TGSC promotes interdisciplinary research, supports faculty and students by developing curricula and academic programs, sponsors cultural activities and guest speakers on transnational and global issues, and conducts outreach. The TGSC offers the Transnational and Global Studies Graduate Certificate. This certificate will enable graduate students to identify one of four tracks that will help strengthen their interdisciplinary studies. The graduate tracks articulate with the undergraduate international studies major. The certificate curriculum is reviewed by the Transnational and Global Studies (TNGS) Certificate Committee for approval but does not supersede the supervisory committee’s role. The graduate certificate recognizes successful completion of course work (13 credits for master’s, 15 credits for Ph.D.) related to transnational and global issues. Courses meeting certificate requirements come from more than 50 graduate courses with specific transnational and global content, organized into four areas of specialization: science and technology, business and economics, global governance and security, and development and area studies.

Students earning the certificate must participate in the Transnational and Global Studies Seminar. The seminar addresses the most pressing transnational and global issues and is led by faculty with expertise in these fields. This course is taken for either 1 credit or 3 credits: a research paper is needed to earn 3 credits. For more information on the Transnational and Global Studies Certificate, contact Ms. Heather A. Barrett, UF International Center, 170 Hub, P.O. Box 113225, Gainesville FL 32611; Phone (352) 273-1531; E-mail hbarrett@ufic.uf.edu; or visit the website (http://www.tgsc.ufl.edu/).

Publisher’s update:  The publishers of the Graduate Catalog have been informed that this certificate program is no longer offered.  (10/26/2011)

Tropical Agriculture

The Center for Tropical Agriculture, in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, seeks to stimulate interest in research and curriculum related to the tropical environment and its development. Website: http://cta.ufl.edu.

Research: International agricultural development assistance contracts frequently have research components. The Center helps coordinate this research.

Minor in tropical agriculture: An interdisciplinary minor in tropical agriculture is available for both master’s and doctoral students majoring in agriculture, forestry, and other fields where knowledge of the tropics is relevant. The minor may include courses treating specific aspects of the tropics such as natural resource management (e.g., soils, water, biodiversity), climate, agricultural production, and the languages and cultures of those who live in tropical countries.

Requirements for the minor at the master’s level include a minimum of 7 letter-graded credit hours. Six letter-graded credit hours chosen from the list of approved courses with the guidance of the supervisory committee. Selected courses must be from outside the student’s major and may not include courses from other academic units which qualify for graduate credit within the home department. One letter-graded credit hour must be a “hands-on” experience in the student’s tropical agriculture selected focus. This experience may take the form of a study abroad, internship, field trip, or special project and must have a time equivalent at least equivalent to a 1-credit graded course.

Requirements for the minor at the Ph.D. level include a minimum of 12 letter-graded credits. Selected courses must be from outside the student’s major and may not include courses from academic units which qualify for graduate credit within the home department. One letter-graded credit hour must be a “hands-on” experience in the student’s tropical agriculture selected focus. This experience may take the form of a study abroad, internship, field trip or special project that must have a time equivalent to a 1 credit letter-graded course. See the list of suggested courses that can be used to meet this requirement. An intent of the minor at the Ph.D. level is to insure each student has an appreciation of the social context within which tropical agriculture is often practiced. To that end, at the discretion of the CTA faculty member, if the student does not have a background that addresses the social context, 3 letter-graded credits may be selected from the social science section of the approved list.

Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA): The certificate emphasizes breadth in topics relevant to tropical agriculture for graduate students (available through the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences). The CTA prepares students for work requiring knowledge of biological and social aspects of tropical agriculture. Students entering the program receive guidance from members of the CTA Steering Committee regarding course work appropriate for careers in international agricultural development.

The CTA requires at least 12 credits. The “typical” certificate program has 12 to 24 credits. These credits may, with approval from supervisory committees, also count toward the M.S. or Ph.D. While foreign language abilities and work experience in a foreign country are strongly encouraged, they are not requisites for the CTA.

For information or application brochure, contact Dr. Richard E. Litz, Director, Center for Tropical Agriculture, University of Florida, c/o Tropical Research and Education Center, 18905 SW 280th Street, Homestead FL 33031, e-mail relitz@ufl.edu or Dr. Nicholas B. Comerford, Soil and Water Science Department, P.O. Box 110290, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL  32611, E-mail nbc@ufl.edu.

Other activities: The Center seeks broad dissemination of knowledge about tropical agriculture by sponsoring conferences, short courses, and seminars featuring leading authorities on the tropics; publishing books, monographs, and proceedings; and by acquiring materials for the library and the data bank.

Tropical Conservation and Development

The Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), in the Center for Latin American Studies, offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate and graduate concentration focused on integrative approaches to conservation and development in Latin America and other tropical regions. Both the certificate and concentration are open to students who are interested in acquiring interdisciplinary knowledge and technical skills to pursue a career in conservation and development research and practice. These students must be enrolled in master’s or Ph.D. programs in TCD’s affiliate academic units at the University of Florida

Course work for the certificate and the concentration includes social science theory, principles of tropical ecology, patterns and trends of tropical resource use and conservation, and research methods. TCD core courses also allow students to gain essential practical skills. Emphasis is on communication and presentation techniques, grant writing, proposal writing, and fundraising; facilitation and conflict management; participatory methods for research and project implementation; and project design, analysis, and evaluation. Summer research, practitioner experiences, and field-based training programs provide learning opportunities outside the classroom.

On completing the certificate or concentration, students should have an in-depth understanding of the relationships among biological conservation, resource management, and the livelihood needs of rural communities; and the appropriate professional skills for a career in research, field practice, or both.

TCD’s affiliate academic units are Agricultural Education and Communication, Agronomy, Anthropology, Comparative Law, Botany, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Latin American Studies, Natural Resources and Environment, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Soil and Water Science, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Women’s Studies, and Zoology.

Master’s students can earn a certificate in TCD by completing 12 credits of approved course work: 2 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical ecology and social science. Ph.D. students can earn a certificate by completing 15 credits of approved course work (3 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical ecology and social science). Students from natural science academic units must take the social science credits outside their major. Otherwise, courses from the student’s major can count toward program requirements. Substitutions need prior approval from the TCD faculty adviser.

To earn a concentration in TCD, students must complete the course requirements for the certificate (as explained above) and they must focus on tropical conservation and development in their thesis, dissertation, or final project. One member of the student’s supervisory committee must be a TCD affiliate faculty member. This person is responsible for judging whether the student’s thesis focuses on tropical conservation and/or development. For the faculty member to make this judgment, the student must articulate in writing how the research fits in the broader context of biodiversity conservation and/or rural development in the tropics. This person cannot count as the external member of the committee.

For more information on the TCD certificate and concentration program, and for a list of approved courses, visit the TCD website (http://www.latam.ufl.edu/tcd), or  contact Marianne Schmink, TCD Director, 301 Grinter Hall, (352) 392-6548 ext. 827, E-mail Schmink@latam.ufl.edu.

Tropical Studies

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a consortium of 50 major educational and research institutions in the United States and abroad, created to promote understanding of tropical environments and their intelligent use by people. The University of Florida is a charter member. Graduate field courses in tropical biology and ecology, agricultural ecology, population biology, and forestry are offered in Costa Rica and Brazil during spring and summer terms. Students are selected on a competitive basis from all OTS member institutions.

A University of Florida graduate student may register for 8 credits in an appropriate course cross-listed with OTS (e.g., PCB 6357C or AGG 6933). The University of Florida does not require tuition for OTS courses. Registration is on the host campus. However, students on Graduate Assistantships must also be registered at UF. Research grants are available through OTS. For more information, contact University of Florida representatives to the OTS board of directors, Dr. Robert Holt (111 Bartram Hall) and Dr. Hugh Popenoe (2169 McCarty Hall).

Vision Sciences

An interdisciplinary specialization in vision sciences is available through the College of Medicine. The Department of Ophthalmology serves as the administrative and logistical center. However, most of the faculty are from the IDP advanced concentrations. Current interests include retinal gene therapy, gene expression in the mammalian retina and lens, especially during fetal development, biochemistry of vision in vertebrates and invertebrates, biochemistry and neurobiology of wound healing and neural tissue degeneration, and molecular and cell biology of animal model retinal degeneration. For more information, contact the Program Director, Dr. W. Clay Smith, P.O. Box 100284, College of Medicine, Gainesville FL 32610-0284, Phone (352) 392-0476.

Wetland Sciences

The Interdisciplinary Concentration in Wetland Sciences (ICWS) is a unified interdisciplinary program in wetland science and policy for master’s and doctoral students.

Graduate faculty from the following academic units contribute to the wetlands sciences concentration: Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Botany, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Landscape Architecture, Law, Soil and Water Sciences, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, and Zoology. Students in any of these programs may elect to participate in the ICWS. A major strength of the ICWS is the breadth of wetlands-related courses and research opportunities in many academic programs across campus. The ICWS exposes students to perspectives outside their disciplines and provides a rigorous, substantive education in wetlands sciences in addition to their disciplinary focus.

Students may complete the ICWS for either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. A core curriculum (15 credits for M.S. and 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides the opportunity for interdisciplinary training in four broad subject areas:

  • wetlands science (1 course each in wetlands ecology, wetland hydrology, and wetlands biogeochemistry),
  • wetlands systems,
  • wetlands organisms, and
  • wetlands policy/law.

Additional course work in a student’s disciplinary focus may strengthen the student’s knowledge base or allow for specialization in one or more of the areas.

For more information, contact Dr. Mark T. Brown, Director, Howard T. Odum Center for Wetlands, Phelps Lab, P.O. Box 116350, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-2424; or visit the website (http://www.cfw.ufl.edu).

Women’s and Gender Studies

Two certificates, one master’s degree (thesis or non-thesis option), and a doctoral concentration are offered in women’s and gender studies. Participating graduate faculty are from several academic units, campus-wide, including Agricultural and Life Sciences, Anthropology, Counselor Education, English, German and Slavic Studies, History, Journalism and Communications, Latin American Studies, Linguistics, Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology, and Teaching and Learning.

The two graduate certificates in women’s studies for master’s and doctoral students are offered in conjunction with degree programs in other academic units. The Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and Development require specific sets of course work to thoroughly ground students in the discipline. The Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies is a general introduction to the field, and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and Development allows students to focus on issues related to gender, economic development, and globalization.

The doctoral interdisciplinary concentrations in women’s and gender studies give graduate students a thorough grounding in the new scholarship produced by the intersection of women’s studies and other academic fields. The concentration facilitates analysis and assessment of theories about the role of gender in cultural systems and its intersections with other categories of differences, such as race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, physical and mental ability, age, and economic and civil status. Emphasis is on participating in women’s and gender studies research and on providing an intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines. Women’s and gender studies critically explores the role and status of women and men, past and present.

Participating academic units award Ph.D. degrees with an interdisciplinary concentration in women’s and gender studies. Study plans are designed by each student’s supervisory committee, whose chair is affiliated with women’s and gender studies.

Admission requirements are those of the student’s home academic unit and college. After admission to the degree-granting academic unit, the application is sent to the Graduate Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies who chairs an admissions committee.

For more information on the master’s degree, see the Programs Section of this catalog ; or contact the Director, Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, 3324 Turlington Hall.

For more information:
The Office of Institutional Planning and Research website provides access to the Florida ExpertNet searchable database of Centers and Institutes. Go to http://expertnet.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=CENTERS.advancedSearch and choose “University of Florida” from the “Limit By” drop-down menu toward the bottom of the page. Finally, click “search” for a complete list of UF Interdisciplinary Research Centers.

Oak Ridge Associated Universities

Since 1948, UF students and faculty of the University of Florida have benefited from its membership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 98 colleges and universities and a contractor of the U.S. Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU works with its member institutions to help their students and faculty gain access to federal research facilities throughout the country; to keep its members informed about opportunities for fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members.

Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that ORAU operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, and faculty enjoy access to a multitude of opportunities for study and research. Students can participate in programs covering a wide variety of disciplines including business, earth sciences, epidemiology, engineering, physics, geological sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. Appointment and program lengths range from 1 month to 4 years. Many of these programs aim to increase the number of underrepresented minority students pursuing degrees in science- and engineering-related disciplines. A comprehensive list of these programs and other opportunities, their disciplines, and details on locations and benefits can be found in the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, which is available at http://www.orau.gov/orise/educ.htm, or by calling either of the contacts below.

ORAU’s Office of Partnership Development seeks opportunities for partnerships and alliances among ORAU’s members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty development programs, such as the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the Visiting Industrial Scholars Program, consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research, and support programs as well as services to chief research officers.

For more information about ORAU and its programs, contact

  1. Dr. Winfred M. Phillips,
    Vice President for Research,
    ORAU Councilor for the University of Florida;
  2. Monnie E. Champion,
    ORAU Corporate Secretary
    (865) 556-3306; or
  3. Visit the ORAU home page at http://www.orau.org.