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2013-2014 Graduate Catalog
University of Florida
   
 
  Nov 24, 2017
 
 
    
2013-2014 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG/PREVIOUS EDITION]

Graduate Degrees


The information in this catalog is current as of July 2013. Please contact individual programs for any additional information or changes.

Definitions
Listing of Degrees and Programs
Requirements for Master’s Degrees
General Regulations for Master’s Degrees
Master of Arts and Master of Science
Other Master’s Degrees
Requirements for Doctoral Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Nursing Practice
Doctor of Plant Medicine
Specialized Graduate Degrees
Engineer
Specialist in Education
Nontraditional Programs
Concurrent Graduate Programs
Joint Degree Programs
State University System Programs

Definitions

Degree is the title conferred by the University on completing the academic program, for example, Doctor of Philosophy. Some degrees include the name of the field of study (Master of Architecture, Master of Education). Others (Master of Arts, Master of Science) do not.

Program (also referred to as the major) is the student’s primary field of study. Programs offered at UF are approved by the Graduate Council, Faculty Senate, Board of Trustees, and Florida Board of Governors (specialist and doctoral degrees). The degree and program name appear on the student’s transcript. Available programs are identified under the degree name in the list of graduate degrees and programs.

Catalog year refers to the rules in effect during the first year a degree-seeking student enrolls in a program; the set of requirements a student must fulfill. If the student takes time off, then the catalog year is the academic year of readmission.

Co-major is a course of study allowing two majors for one Ph.D. degree. Each co-major must be approved by the Graduate Council.

Combined degree program is a combined bachelor’s and master’s degree program allowing an academically advanced undergraduate student to take graduate courses before completing the bachelor’s degree and to count 12 graduate credits toward both degrees. Students admitted into a combined program will normally have above average GPAs and superior scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing portions of the GRE. Individual academic units determine whether a combined degree program is appropriate. Combined degree programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

Concentration is a subprogram in a major. Concentrations offered at UF are approved by the Graduate Council. The concentration, degree, and program may appear on the student transcript.

Concurrent degree program is simultaneous study on an individualized basis that leads to two master’s degrees in two different graduate programs or two master’s degrees in the same major. Such a program is initiated by the student and requires prior approval of each academic unit and the Graduate School. Graduate School approval for participation in a concurrent degree program must be obtained prior to the published midpoint deadline of the term in which the first degree is to be awarded.  Retroactive requests will not be considered. Ultimately, it the student’s responsibility to follow up with the academic units to verify that all Graduate School approvals and deadlines have been met.  If the student is approved to pursue two master’s degrees, no more than 9 credits of course work from one degree program may be applied toward the second master’s degree.

Cooperative degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded by UF with more than one institution authorized to provide course work.

Graduate certificate is a formal collection of courses that form a coherent program of study offered through an academic unit. They are certified by the college, approved by the Graduate Council, and listed on the transcript.  

Jointly conferred degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded jointly by UF and another institution.

Joint degree program is a course of study that leads simultaneously to a graduate degree and a professional degree (i.e., D.M.D., D.V.M., J.D., M.D., Pharm.D.). Normally 12 credits of professional courses are counted toward the graduate degree and 12 credits of graduate courses are counted toward the professional degree. Individual academic units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate. Joint programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

Lockstep programs are defined as cohorts who move together in the same enrollment sequence with courses taught in a particular order, on a particular schedule. Students have no flexibility in their program or sequence, and may not drop in and out of courses independently.

Minor is a block of course work completed in any academic unit outside the major.  The minor must be approved by the student’s academic unit and the academic unit offering the minor.  If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee must include a representative from the minor field. A minor requires at least 6 to 15 credits depending on the degree level. The minor appears on the student’s transcript along with the program name and the degree awarded. 

Multi-college program is a degree program offered through more than one college.

Specialization is an informal designation used by academic units to indicate areas of research or scholarly strength, and has no formal significance. Track and emphasis are similar unofficial terms. No tracks, emphases, or specializations appear in official lists in this catalog or on the student transcript.

Supervisory Committee (thesis and dissertation degrees): All graduate degrees must have graduate faculty oversee the student’s program of study and progress. For thesis and dissertation degrees, this oversight authority is accomplished by a formal committee. These committees have slightly different criteria based on the particular degree. Thesis and dissertation committees are monitored by the Graduate School as part of degree certification using information entered into the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS).

Supervisory Committee (non-thesis degrees): For non-thesis degree programs, the oversight is at the academic unit/department/college level only. Non-thesis programs may choose to have a formal committee or an alternate structure as determined by the program’s graduate faculty and consistent with academic unit policies. The oversight authority will be considered as the supervisory committee. Units are able to enter their internal information into GIMS as a convenience. Regardless of degree program, any student with a minor must have the name of the graduate faculty member overseeing the minor entered into GIMS.

All other degree combinations that involve a graduate degree as at least one component (not addressed in the above definitions) require a formal approval process through the academic units offering the degree programs and the Graduate School.

Taking multiple courses within a discipline does not constitute admission to that discipline’s graduate programs.

The primary/home academic unit must contact the Graduate School’s Student Records Unit for procedural details and deadlines. In all cases, each academic unit must submit appropriate programs of study to the Graduate School for review. Graduate School approval for participation must be obtained prior to the published Midpoint deadline of the term in which the first degree is to be awarded. Retroactive requests will not be considered.

Ultimately, it is the student’s responsibility to follow up with the academic units to verify that all Graduate School approvals and deadlines have been met.


Listing of Degrees and Programs

See the Majors Section of this catalog  for specializations in the approved programs.

T=thesis or dissertation N=non-thesis or no dissertation.
Degree names and correct abbreviations are listed in bold.
Majors are listed in standard type.
Concentrations are listed under the major in italics. 

Graduate Degrees Offered by the University of Florida

Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)N

AccountingN
 
Master of Advertising (M.Adv.)T
AdvertisingT
 
Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.)N
Food and Resource EconomicsN
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
 
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)T
ArchitectureT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable ArchitectureT
Sustainable DesignT
 
Master of Arts (M.A.)T/N
Anthropology T/N
Historic PreservationT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Art T
Digital Arts and SciencesT
Art Education T/N
Art History T
Business AdministrationT/N
Marketing T/N
Classical Studies T
Communication Sciences and DisordersT/N
Criminology, Law, and SocietyT/N
Digital Arts and SciencesT
EconomicsT/N
EnglishT/N
French and Francophone StudiesT/N
Geography T
Applications of Geographic Technologies T
Geographic Information SystemsT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
GermanT/N
HistoryT/N
Historic PreservationT/N
Jewish StudiesT/N
International BusinessT/N
Latin T
Latin American Studies T
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Linguistics T/N
Mathematics T/N
MuseologyT
Historic PreservationT
Philosophy T/N
Political Science - International RelationsT/N
Political Science T/N
International Development Policy and AdministrationT/N
Political CampaigningT/N
Public AffairsT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
PsychologyT/N
Religion T/N
Jewish StudiesT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Women’s/Gender StudiesT/N
SociologyT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Spanish T/N
Women’s StudiesT/N
 
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)T
Curriculum and InstructionT
Early Childhood Education T
Educational Leadership T
Elementary Education T
English Education T
Marriage and Family Counseling T
Mathematics Education T
Mental Health Counseling T
Reading Education T
Research and Evaluation Methodology T
School Counseling and Guidance T
School Psychology T
Science Education T
Social Studies Education T
Special Education T
Student Personnel in Higher Education T
 
Master of Arts in Mass Communication (M.A.M.C.)T/N
Mass CommunicationT/N
 
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)N
Anthropology N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
French and Francophone StudiesN
Latin N
Latin American Studies N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Mathematics N
Philosophy N
Political Science - International RelationsN
Spanish N
 
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.)T
Urban and Regional PlanningT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable DesignT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
 
Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.)N
Building ConstructionN
Historic PreservationN
Sustainable ConstructionN
Sustainable DesignN
 
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)N
Business AdministrationN
Competitive Strategy N
EntrepreneurshipN
Finance N
Global Management N
Graham-Buffett Security Analysis N
Human Resource Management N
Information Systems and Operations ManagementN
International Studies N
Latin American Business N
Management N
Marketing N
Real Estate N
Sports Administration N
 
Master of Education (M.Ed.)N
Curriculum and InstructionN
Early Childhood Education N
Educational Leadership N
Elementary Education N
English Education N
Marriage and Family Counseling N
Mathematics Education N
Mental Health Counseling N
Reading Education N
Research and Evaluation Methodology N
School Counseling and Guidance N
School Psychology N
Science Education N
Social Studies Education N
Special Education N
Student Personnel in Higher Education N
 
Master of Engineering (M.E.)T/N
Aerospace EngineeringT/N
Agricultural and Biological EngineeringT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Biomedical EngineeringT/N
Chemical EngineeringT/N
Civil EngineeringT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Coastal and Oceanographic EngineeringT/N
Computer EngineeringT/N
Electrical and Computer EngineeringT/N
Environmental Engineering SciencesT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Industrial and Systems EngineeringT/N
Materials Science and EngineeringT/N
Mechanical EngineeringT/N
Nuclear Engineering SciencesT/N
 
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)T
Art T
Creative Writing T
Theatre T
 
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.)N
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesN
Ecological RestorationN
Geographic Information SystemsN
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationN
Wetland SciencesN
 
Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.)N
Forest Resources and ConservationN
AgroforestryN
Ecological RestorationN
Geographic Information SystemsN
GeomaticsN
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationN
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Wetland SciencesN
 
Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.)N
Health AdministrationN
 
Master of Health Science (M.H.S.)T/N
Environmental and Global HealthT
One HealthT
Occupational TherapyT/N
 
Master of Historic Preservation (M.H.P.)T
Historic PreservationT
 
Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.)T
Interior DesignT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable DesignT
 
Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.)N
International Construction ManagementN
Historic PreservationN
 
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)T
Landscape ArchitectureT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable DesignT
Wetland SciencesT
 
Master of Latin (M.L.)N
Latin N
 
Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law)N
Comparative LawN
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
 
Master of Laws in Environmental and Land Use Law (LL.M.E.L.U.)N
Environmental and Land Use LawN
 
Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.Int)N
International TaxationN
 
Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.Tax.)N
TaxationN
 
Master of Music (M.M.)T/N
Music T
Choral ConductingT
Composition T
Electronic MusicT
EthnomusicologyT
Instrumental Conducting T
Music EducationT
Music History and Literature T
Music Theory T
Performance T
Sacred Music T
Music Education T/N
Choral ConductingT/N
Composition T/N
Electronic MusicT/N
EthnomusicologyT/N
Instrumental Conducting T/N
Music History and Literature T/N
Music Theory T/N
Performance T/N
Piano PedagogyT/N
 
Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.)N
Occupational TherapyN
 
Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)N
Public HealthN
BiostatisticsN
Environmental HealthN
EpidemiologyN
Health Management and PolicyN
Public Health PracticeN
Social and Behavioral SciencesN
 
Master of Science (M.S.)T/N
Aerospace EngineeringT/N
Agricultural and Biological EngineeringT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Agricultural Education and CommunicationT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
AgronomyT/N
AgroecologyT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Animal SciencesT/N
Applied Physiology and KinesiologyT/N
Athletic Training/Sports MedicineT/N
Biobehavioral ScienceT/N
Clinical Exercise Physiology T/N
Exercise PhysiologyT/N
Human PerformanceT/N
Astronomy T/N
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Biomedical EngineeringT/N
Medical PhysicsT/N
BiostatisticsN
Botany T
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Business AdministrationT/N
Marketing T/N
RetailingT/N
Chemical EngineeringT/N
Chemistry T/N
Civil EngineeringT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Coastal and Oceanographic EngineeringT/N
Computer EngineeringT/N
Digital Arts and SciencesT/N
Computer SciencesT/N
Dental SciencesT
Endodontics T
Orthodontics T
Periodontics T
Prosthodontics T
Digital Arts and SciencesT
Electrical and Computer EngineeringT/N
Entomology and NematologyT/N
EntrepreneurshipT/N
Environmental Engineering SciencesT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
EpidemiologyT
BiostatisticsT
Health Management and PolicyT
Family, Youth and Community SciencesT/N
Community StudiesT/N
Family and Youth DevelopmentT/N
Nonprofit Organization DevelopmentT/N
FinanceT/N
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesT
Ecological RestorationT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationT
Wetland SciencesT
Food and Resource EconomicsT/N
AgribusinessT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
ToxicologyT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Food Science and Human NutritionT/N
Nutritional Sciences T/N
Forest Resources and ConservationT/N
AgroforestryT/N
Ecological RestorationT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
GeomaticsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Geography T
Applications of Geographic Technologies T
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Geology T
Hydrologic SciencesT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Health Education and BehaviorT/N
Horticultural SciencesT/N
Environmental Horticulture T/N
Horticultural SciencesT/N
Industrial and Systems EngineeringT/N
Information Systems and Operations ManagementT/N
Supply Chain ManagementT/N
Interdisciplinary EcologyT/N
Agricultural and Biological EngineeringT/N
Agricultural Education and CommunicationT/N
AgronomyT/N
AnthropologyT/N
ArchitectureT/N
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T/N
BotanyT/N
Business AdministrationT/N
ChemistryT/N
Civil EngineeringT/N
Coastal and Oceanographic EngineeringT/N
EconomicsT/N
EnglishT/N
Entomology and NematologyT/N
Environmental Engineering SciencesT/N
Family, Youth and Community SciencesT/N
Farming Systems T/N
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesT/N
Food and Resource EconomicsT/N
Food Science T/N
Forest Resources and ConservationT/N
Foundations of EducationT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
GeographyT/N
GeologyT/N
Health and Human PerformanceT/N
Horticultural SciencesT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Landscape ArchitectureT/N
MathematicsT/N
Microbiology and Cell ScienceT/N
Nuclear and Radiological EngineeringT/N
PhilosophyT/N
Political ScienceT/N
ReligionT/N
SociologyT/N
Soil and Water ScienceT/N
StatisticsT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Urban and Regional PlanningT/N
Veterinary Medical SciencesT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Wildlife Ecology And ConservationT/N
Women’s/Gender StudiesT/N
ZoologyT/N
ManagementT/N
Health Care Risk ManagementT/N
Materials Science and EngineeringT/N
Mathematics T/N
Mechanical EngineeringT/N
Medical SciencesT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Health Outcomes and PolicyT
Translational BiotechnologyT
Microbiology and Cell Science T/N
Nuclear Engineering SciencesT/N
Physics T/N
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Plant PathologyT/N
PsychologyT/N
Real EstateT/N
Recreation, Parks, and TourismT/N
Historic PreservationT/N
Natural Resource Recreation T/N
Therapeutic Recreation T/N
Tourism T/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Soil and Water Science T/N
AgroecologyT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Hydrologic SciencesT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Sport ManagementT/N
Historic PreservationT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Veterinary Medical SciencesT/N
Forensic ToxicologyT/N
Wildlife Ecology and ConservationT/N
Geographic Information SystemsT/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
Zoology T/N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT/N
Wetland SciencesT/N
 
Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.)T
ArchitectureT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable ArchitectureT
Sustainable DesignT
 
Master of Science in Building Construction (M.S.B.C.)T
Building ConstructionT
Historic PreservationT
Sustainable ConstructionT
Sustainable DesignT
 
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.)T/N
NursingT/N
 
Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S.P.)T/N
Pharmaceutical SciencesT/N
Clinical PharmacyT/N
Clinical ToxicologyT/N
Forensic DNA and SerologyT/N
Forensic Drug ChemistryT/N
Forensic ScienceT/N
Medication Therapy ManagementT/N
Medicinal Chemistry T/N
Pharmaceutical ChemistryT/N
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and PolicyT/N
Pharmacodynamics T/N
Pharmacy T/N
 
Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.)T
StatisticsT
 
Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.)N
Astronomy N
Botany N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Wetland SciencesN
Chemistry N
Geography N
Geographic Information SystemsN
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Wetland SciencesN
Geology N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Wetland SciencesN
Mathematics N
Physics N
Zoology N
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN
Wetland SciencesN
 
Master of Statistics (M.Stat.)N
StatisticsN
 
Master of Sustainable Development Practice (M.D.P.)N
Sustainable Development PracticeN
 
Engineer (Engr.)T/N
Chemical EngineeringT/N
Industrial and Systems EngineeringT/N
 
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)N
Curriculum and InstructionN
Educational Leadership N
Higher Education Administration N
Marriage and Family Counseling N
Mental Health Counseling N
Research and Evaluation Methodology N
School Counseling and Guidance N
School Psychology N
Special Education N
Student Personnel in Higher Education N
 
Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.)N
AudiologyN
 
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)T
Curriculum and InstructionT
Educational Leadership T
Educational PolicyT
Higher Education Administration T
Educational PolicyT
Marriage and Family Counseling T
Mental Health Counseling T
Research and Evaluation Methodology T
School Counseling and Guidance T
School Psychology T
Special Education T
 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)T
Aerospace EngineeringT
Agricultural and Biological EngineeringT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Wetland SciencesT
Agricultural Education and CommunicationT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
AgronomyT
ToxicologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Animal SciencesT
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Anthropology T
Historic PreservationT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Art History T
Astronomy T
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Mammalian GeneticsT
ToxicologyT
Biomedical EngineeringT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Medical PhysicsT
BiostatisticsT
Botany T
ToxicologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Business AdministrationT
Accounting T
Finance T
Information Systems and Operations ManagementT
Insurance T
Management T
Marketing T
Quantitative FinanceT
Real Estate and Urban AnalysisT
Chemical EngineeringT
Chemistry T
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Civil EngineeringT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Wetland SciencesT
Classical Studies T
Coastal and Oceanographic EngineeringT
Communication Sciences and DisordersT
Computer EngineeringT
Counseling Psychology T
Criminology, Law, and SocietyT
Curriculum and InstructionT
Design, Construction, and PlanningT
Construction ManagementT
Historic PreservationT
Interior DesignT
Landscape ArchitectureT
Urban and Regional PlanningT
EconomicsT
Educational Leadership T
Educational PolicyT
Electrical and Computer EngineeringT
EnglishT
Entomology and NematologyT
Environmental Engineering SciencesT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Wetland SciencesT
EpidemiologyT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesT
Ecological RestorationT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationT
Wetland SciencesT
Food and Resource EconomicsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
ToxicologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Food Science and Human NutritionT
Food Science T
ToxicologyT
Forest Resources and ConservationT
AgroforestryT
Geographic Information SystemsT
GeomaticsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Natural Resource Policy and AdministrationT
ToxicologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Genetics and GenomicsT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Geography T
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Geology T
Hydrologic SciencesT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
GermanT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Health and Human Performance T
Applied Physiology and KinesiologyT
Biobehavioral ScienceT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Exercise PhysiologyT
Health Behavior T
Historic PreservationT
Recreation, Parks, and TourismT
Sport Management T
Health Services Research T
Higher Education Administration T
Educational PolicyT
HistoryT
Historic PreservationT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Horticultural SciencesT
Environmental Horticulture T
Horticultural SciencesT
ToxicologyT
Industrial and Systems EngineeringT
Quantitative FinanceT
Interdisciplinary EcologyT
Agricultural and Biological EngineeringT
Agricultural Education and CommunicationT
AgronomyT
AnthropologyT
ArchitectureT
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
BotanyT
Business AdministrationT
ChemistryT
Civil EngineeringT
Coastal and Oceanographic EngineeringT
EconomicsT
EnglishT
Entomology and NematologyT
Environmental Engineering SciencesT
Family, Youth and Community SciencesT
Farming Systems T
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesT
Food and Resource EconomicsT
Food Science T
Forest Resources and ConservationT
Foundations of EducationT
Geographic Information SystemsT
GeographyT
GeologyT
Health and Human PerformanceT
Horticultural SciencesT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Landscape ArchitectureT
MathematicsT
Microbiology and Cell ScienceT
Nuclear and Radiological EngineeringT
PhilosophyT
Political ScienceT
ReligionT
SociologyT
Soil and Water ScienceT
StatisticsT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Urban and Regional PlanningT
Veterinary Medical SciencesT
Wetland SciencesT
Wildlife Ecology And ConservationT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
ZoologyT
Linguistics T
Marriage and Family Counseling T
Mass CommunicationT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Materials Science and EngineeringT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Mathematics T
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Quantitative FinanceT
Mechanical EngineeringT
Medical SciencesT
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Genetics T
Health Outcomes and PolicyT
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Immunology and Microbiology T
Molecular Cell Biology T
Neuroscience T
Physiology and Pharmacology T
ToxicologyT
Mental Health Counseling T
Microbiology and Cell Science T
ToxicologyT
Music T
Composition T
Music History and Literature T
Music Education T
Nuclear Engineering SciencesT
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Nursing Sciences T
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Nutritional SciencesT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Pharmaceutical SciencesT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Clinical Pharmaceutical SciencesT
Medicinal Chemistry T
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and PolicyT
Pharmacodynamics T
Pharmacy T
ToxicologyT
Philosophy T
Physics T
Imaging Science and TechnologyT
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology T
ToxicologyT
Plant PathologyT
ToxicologyT
Political Science T
Educational PolicyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
PsychologyT
Clinical and Health Psychology T
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Public HealthT
Environmental HealthT
One HealthT
Social and Behavioral SciencesT
Rehabilitation Science T
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
Religion T
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Research and Evaluation Methodology T
Romance LanguagesT
French and Francophone StudiesT
Spanish T
School Counseling and Guidance T
School Psychology T
SociologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Women’s/Gender StudiesT
Soil and Water Science T
Geographic Information SystemsT
Hydrologic SciencesT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Special Education T
StatisticsT
Quantitative FinanceT
Veterinary Medical SciencesT
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Clinical and Translational ScienceT
ToxicologyT
Wildlife Ecology and ConservationT
Geographic Information SystemsT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
Zoology T
Animal Molecular and Cellular BiologyT
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentT
Wetland SciencesT
 
Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.)N
Plant MedicineN
Tropical Conservation and DevelopmentN

Requirements for Master’s Degrees

The master’s degree is conferred only on completing a coherent and focused program of advanced study. Each academic unit sets its own minimum degree requirements beyond the minimum required by the Graduate Council.

General Regulations for Master’s Degrees

Graduate School regulations are as follows. Colleges and academic units may have additional regulations beyond those stated below. Unless otherwise indicated in the next sections on master’s degrees, these general regulations apply to all master’s degree programs at the University.

Course requirements: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered 5000 and above. The program of course work for a master’s degree must be approved by the student’s adviser, supervisory committee, or faculty representative of the academic unit. No more than 9 credits from a previous master’s degree program may apply toward a second master’s degree. These credits are applied only with the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Major: Work in the major must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work outside the major, 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if part of an approved plan of study.

Minor: Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major. If an academic unit contributes more than one course (as specified in the curriculum inventory and/or the Graduate Catalog) to the major, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing academic unit. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits of work are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors may be taken with the major academic unit’s permission. A 3.00 (truncated) GPA is required for minor credit.  

Degree requirements: Unless otherwise specified, for any master’s degree, the student must earn at least 30 credits as a graduate student at UF. No more than 9 of the 30 credits (earned with a grade of A, A-, B+, or B) may be transferred from institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least half of the required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major.

Transfer of credit: Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include no more than 9 credits from institution/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at the University of Florida. Credits transferred from other universities are applied toward the degree requirements, but grades earned are not computed in the student’s grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the student’s supervisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Academic units must submit petitions for transfer of credit for a master’s degree during the student’s first term of enrollment in the Graduate School.

The supervisory committee is responsible for using established criteria to ensure the academic integrity of course work before accepting graduate transfer credits.

Supervisory committee: The student’s supervisory committee must be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to the Graduate School and no later than the second term of graduate study.

Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective academic unit chair, approved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. Only Graduate Faculty may serve on a supervisory committee. If a student takes fewer than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of the term during which the student has accumulated 12 or more credits or the end of the second term. If a minor is designated for any degree, a representative from that minor is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are designated, two representatives are needed.

The supervisory committee for a master’s degree with a thesis should consist of at least two Graduate Faculty members, unless otherwise specified. If a minor is designated, the committee must include a Graduate Faculty member from the minor department.

For a master’s degree without thesis, oversight is at the academic unit/department/college level only. Non-thesis programs may choose to have a formal committee or an alternate structure as determined by the program’s graduate faculty and consistent with academic unit policies. The oversight authority will be considered as the supervisory committee. Units are able to enter their internal information into GIMS as a convenience. Any student with a minor must have the name of the graduate faculty member overseeing the minor entered into GIMS.

Changes to existing supervisory committee: A student, in consultation with his or her academic unit, may seek changes to an existing supervisory committee. Changes to a student’s committee are allowed until midpoint of the term of degree award if the defense has not occurred. No changes are allowed after the defense. For procedural details, contact the major academic unit.

Language requirements: (1) Each academic unit determines whether a reading knowledge of a foreign language is required. The requirement varies from one academic unit to another, and the student should check with the appropriate academic unit for specific information. (2) All candidates must be able to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee.

Examination: Each candidate must pass a final comprehensive examination. Some programs use different terminology, such as capstone course. This examination must cover at least the candidate’s field of concentration. It must occur no earlier than the term before the degree is awarded.

Time limitation: All work (including transferred credit) counted toward the master’s degree must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

Leave of absence: Any student who will not register at UF for a period of more than 1 term needs prior written approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence for a designated period of time. This approval remains in the student’s departmental file. The Graduate School does not require notification. The student must reapply for admission on return. See Readmission and Catalog Year.

Master of Arts and Master of Science

The general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees also apply to the following degrees: Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Mass Communication, Master of Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in Pharmacy, and Master of Science in Statistics. There are additional requirements for specialized degrees.

Course requirements: A master’s degree with thesis requires at least 30 credits including up to 6 credits of Research for Master’s Thesis (6971). All thesis students must register for an appropriate number of credits in 6971.

A non-thesis Master of Arts or Master of Science degree requires at least 30 credits. No more than 6 of those credits can be from S/U courses. Non-thesis students cannot use Research for Master’s Thesis (6971).

For all master’s programs, at least half the required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major. One or two minors of at least 6 credits each may be taken, but a minor is not required by the Graduate School. Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major.

Non-thesis M.S. engineering programs: Students in engineering, if working at off-campus centers, must take half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a comprehensive written examination by a committee recommended by the Dean of the College of Engineering. This written comprehensive examination may be taken at an off-campus site.

Master’s thesis requirements: Each master’s thesis candidate must prepare and present a thesis that shows independent investigation.  It must be acceptable, in form and content, to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, guided by the Graduate School’s format requirements. The academic unit is responsible for quality and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate School Editorial Office, as agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to briefly review theses and dissertations for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as required.

Format requirements and example pages: 
graduateschool.ufl.edu/files/etd-guide.pdf

Checklist: 
http://graduateschool.ufl.edu/files/checklist-thesis.pdf

Application Support Center/Electronic Theses and Dissertation Lab:
https://asc.helpdesk.ufl.edu/

Graduate School Editorial Office Information:
http://graduateschool.ufl.edu/graduation/thesis-and-dissertation

Gatorlink e-mail requirement: UF requires students to maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail accounts. Accordingly, the Editorial Office only communicates with students through official Gatorlink e-mail. 

Thesis first submission: When first presented to the Graduate School Editorial Office, the thesis must be successfully defended. Therefore, the final examination data must be posted in Graduate Information Management System (GIMS), prior to the student attempting to submit their thesis document for review by the Graduate School’s editorial staff.  Directly after the oral defense, the Academic Unit must submit the Final Exam Form and the UF Publishing Agreement through (GIMS) . Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the thesis should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the thesis, before attempting to make submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards required for an editorial review

Should the document pass the submission requirements and appear acceptable for review, the Editorial Office will e-mail the student, using their Gatorlink email address, confirming the submission, and responding with an acceptance e-mail. Should the document not pass first submission requirements, a denial e-mail will instead be sent, advising the student of their options at that time.  This notice must be addressed immediately.  Once a successful first submission has been achieved and the document has been reviewed by one of the Graduate School’s editors, another e-mail is sent, providing editorial feedback to the student and committee chair.  The student is responsible for retrieving the thesis, review comments, and resolving any deficits related to the format requirements. Students should promptly make all required changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf for Editorial Final Submission: After changes have been made to the satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page is submitted electronically to the Graduate School Editorial Office, via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). This must be completed by the Editorial Office’s Final Submission Deadline.  Once submitted, the student should upload and submit the final pdf of the electronic thesis, using the Editorial Document Management (EDM) system.  The document will undergo a final review by one of the Graduate School Representatives. The Editorial Office ensures that the format is acceptable, that all indicated changes were made, and that all of the hyperlinks work within the document. The Graduate School Representative then e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD. If accepted, no further changes are allowed.  If changes are still required, the student should resubmit the corrected document as soon as possible. All documents must be confirmed with final approval emails from the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Clearance deadline. This deadline is firm, and no exceptions can be granted. When all changes have been made and approved, the Editorial Office will email the Committee Chair and the student with a message, indicating the student has achieved Editorial Final Clearance with the Graduate School’s Editorial Office.  

Editorial Final Clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final thesis must be confirmed as accepted, by email, by 5:00 p.m. on this deadline. This deadline only applies if all other posted deadlines for the term have been appropriately met.  Since there are hundreds of students concurrently completing the process, most students complete all requirements well in advance, in order to ensure they do not face the chance of not graduating within their intended term.

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having written the thesis. A copyright page should be included immediately after the title page to indicate this.

Thesis language: Theses must be written in English, except for students pursuing degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in these disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic language. A foreign language thesis should have the Acknowledgements, Abstract, and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1 should also be in English.

Journal articles: A thesis may include journal articles as chapters, if all copyright considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 is a general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last chapter contains the general conclusions, once again tying everything together into a unified whole. Any chapter representing a journal article requires a footnote at the bottom of the first page of the chapter: “Reprinted with permission from … ” giving the source, just as it appears in the list of references. The thesis must have only 1 abstract and 1 reference list.

Change from thesis to non-thesis option: Permission of the supervisory committee is needed to change from thesis to non-thesis option. This permission must be forwarded to the Graduate School by midpoint of the final term via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). The candidate must meet all the requirements of the non-thesis option as specified above. A maximum of 3 credits earned with a grade of S in 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis) can be counted toward the degree requirements only if converted to credit as A, A-, B+, or B in Individual Work. The supervisory committee must indicate that the work was productive in and by itself and that the work warrants credit as a special problem or special topic course. 

Supervisory committee: The student’s supervisory committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to the Graduate School and no later than the second term of graduate study. Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective academic unit chair, approved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. Only Graduate Faculty may serve on a supervisory committee. If a student takes fewer than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of the term during which the student has accumulated 12 or more credits or the end of the second term. If a minor is designated for any degree, a representative from that minor is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are designated, two representatives are needed.

Thesis final examination: When most of the student’s course work is completed, and the thesis is in final form, the supervisory committee must examine the student orally or in writing on (1) the thesis, (2) the major subjects, (3) the minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature pertaining to the field of study.

The candidate and the supervisory committee chair or cochair must be physically present together at the same location. With approval of the entire committee, other members may attend the defense remotely, using modern communication technology. If a supervisory committee member cannot be present at the student’s final defense, a Graduate Faculty member in the same academic unit may substitute for the absent committee member. No substitutions are allowed for the Chair. 

The substitute should sign the Final Examination form on the left side, in the space provided for committee members, noting the name of the absent member. The chair of the student’s major academic unit also must indicate the reason for the absence and state that the absent member agreed to this substitution at the final examination.  The substitute should not sign the ETD signature page. The original committee member must sign. 

The defense date must be fewer than 6 months before degree award. All forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate and the supervisory committee chair sign the UF Publishing Agreement form; and the entire supervisory committee signs the ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report. If thesis changes are requested, the supervisory Committee Chair or the Committee’s designee may hold the ETD Signature Page, until all requirements are met regarding the thesis. Once all stipulations of the Committee members are satisfied, and before the Editorial Office’s Final Submission deadline for the term of intended degree award, verification of completion of this form must be submitted electronically via GIMS.

Non-thesis final comprehensive examination: Non-thesis students must pass a comprehensive written or oral examination on the major and on the minor if a minor is designated. This comprehensive examination must be taken no more than 6 months before the degree is awarded.

Other Master’s Degrees

Although the general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees also apply to the following discipline-specific degrees, there are some important differences. For detailed requirements, see  the Programs Section of this catalog . In addition, the Graduate School monitors the following requirements for these specialized degrees.

Master of Accounting

The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is the graduate degree for students seeking professional careers in public accounting, business organizations, and government. The M.Acc. program offers specializations in auditing/financial accounting, accounting systems, and taxation.

The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-year program with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting and the Master of Accounting degrees on satisfactory completion of the 150-credit program. The entry point into the 3/2 is the start of the senior year.

Students who have already completed an undergraduate degree in accounting may enter the 1-year M.Acc. program, which requires 34 credits of course work. At least 18 credits must be in graduate-level accounting, excluding preparatory courses. All students must take a final comprehensive examination. For details about requirements, see General Regulations for master’s degrees.

M.Acc./J.D. program: This joint program culminates in both the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree awarded by the College of Law and the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree awarded by the Graduate School. The program is for students with an undergraduate degree in accounting, who are interested in advanced studies in both accounting and law. About 20 credits fewer are needed for the joint program than if the two degrees were earned separately. The two degrees are awarded after completing curriculum requirements for both degrees. Students must take the GMAT (or the GRE), and also the LSAT before admission, and must meet the admission requirements for the College of Law (J.D.) and the Fisher School of Accounting (M.Acc.).

Master of Advertising

The Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) program develops leaders in the profession by giving students theoretical, research, and decision-making skills essential for strategic advertising and integrated communications planning; and the opportunity to develop expertise in an area such as account management, research, creative strategy, media planning, international and cross cultural advertising, new technology, special market advertising, and advertising sales management.

Students without a basic course or substantial professional experience in marketing or advertising must complete articulation courses before entering the program. All students must complete a basic statistics course before entering. The M.Adv. requires at least 33 credits and a thesis. Some areas allow a terminal project in lieu of thesis (with permission from the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty).

Students select a supervisory committee to guide selection of courses, selection of thesis topic (or project in lieu of thesis), and completion of the thesis or project. At least one committee member must be from the Department of Advertising’s Graduate Faculty.

Students complete and orally defend their theses or projects. The student’s supervisory committee is responsible for evaluating the thesis or project and the final defense.

Master of Agribusiness

The Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.) is a four-semester, thirty-credit hour non-thesis degree program that begins in Summer B and ends the following Summer C term. It is designed for students with no educational background in Economics and offers advanced study for students seeking careers in sales, marketing, and management with organizations that operate mainly in the food industry and agribusiness sector. The courses complement the student’s undergraduate education and prepare them for careers in private industry, state and federal government, education at secondary and post-secondary institutions, entrepreneurial pursuits, professional schools, financial analysis, agricultural production and marketing, food and consumer goods, and sales firms. The program includes a diversity of students from areas such as Animal Science, Food Science, Horticulture, Agricultural Education and Communication, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Turfgrass Management, Business Administration and Agronomy.

To be considered for admission, applicants must have a B or better grade in statistics, management, financial accounting and principles of microeconomics or AEB 2014. Contact the Graduate Program for information on additional requirements.

Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) is an accredited graduate degree meeting the professional requirements of the National Architectural Accrediting Board for students who wish to qualify for registration and practice as architects. Candidates are admitted from architectural, related, and unrelated undergraduate backgrounds; professional experience is encouraged but not required.

The M.Arch. requires at least 52 credits, including no more than 6 credits in ARC 6971 or 6979. Course sequences in design history and theory, structures, technology, and practice must be completed. Students are encouraged to propose individual programs of study (outside of required courses), and interdisciplinary work is encouraged.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Science in Teaching

These degrees (M.A.T., M.S.T.) combine graduate study in a discipline with selected education courses and a teaching internship, providing flexible curricula that prepare students for a variety of options including teaching and further graduate work.

Requirements for the degrees are as follows:

  • A reading knowledge of one foreign language if required by the student’s major. 
  • Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits while registered as a graduate student, with work distributed as follows:
  • At least 18 credits in the major and 6 credits in the minor.
  • Six credits in an academic unit internship in teaching (6943 Internship in College Teaching). Three years of successful teaching experience in a state-certified school may be substituted for the internship requirement, and credits thus made available may be used for further work in the major, the minor, or in education.
  • At least one course selected from three or more of the following: social and/or psychological foundations of education; education technology; counselor education; special education, and community college curriculum. Other areas may be added or substituted at the discretion of the supervisory committee. These courses may be used to comprise a minor.
  • Off-campus work: At least 8 to 16 credits (at the academic unit’s discretion), including at least 6 credits in one term, must be earned on the Gainesville campus. Beyond that, credits earned in off-campus UF courses approved by the Graduate School are accepted if they are appropriate to the student’s degree program as determined by the supervisory committee.
  • At degree completion, the student needs at least 36 credits in the major for certification purposes.
  • The student must pass a final comprehensive examination (written, oral, or both). This examination covers the field of concentration and the minor.

Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning

The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.) is a graduate degree for professional urban and regional planners and meets the educational requirements for the American Institute of Certified Planners. The program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. General requirements are the same as for other Master of Arts degrees with thesis, except that the minimum registration required is 52 credits including no more than 6 credits in URP 6971 or 6979. All areas allow a project (requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis (with permission from the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty).

M.A.U.R.P./J.D. joint program: A 4-year program leading to the Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the College of Law and the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, Department of Urban and Regional Planning. For students interested in the legal problems of urban and regional planning, this program blends law studies with relevant course work in the planning curriculum. Students receive both degrees at the end of a 4-year course of study whereas separate programs would require 5 years. Students must take the GRE and the LSAT before admission, must be admitted to both programs, and must complete the first year of law school course work before commingling law and planning courses. A thesis is required on completing the course work.

Interested students should apply to both the Holland Law Center and the Graduate School, noting on the application the joint nature of their admission requests. For more information on the program, contact the Holland Law Center and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Master of Building Construction

The Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) degree is for students pursuing advanced work in construction management, construction techniques, and research problems in the construction field.

General requirements are the same as for the Master of Science in Building Construction degree except that the M.B.C. requires at least 36 graduate credits. A thesis is not required. All candidates are required to pass a comprehensive examination at the completion of course work.

Joint Program: The M.B.C./J.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Levin College of Law.

Master of Business Administration

The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree gives students (1) conceptual knowledge for understanding the functions and behaviors common to business organizations and (2) analytical, problem-solving, and decision-making skills essential for effective management. Emphasis is on developing the student’s capacities and skills for business decision making. 

The traditional MBA curriculum is structured so that students may extend their knowledge in a specialized field. The program offers certificate programs in: financial services, hospitality management, supply chain management, information systems and operations management, entrepreneurship and technology management, and global management; and concentrations in finance, security analysis, real estate, competitive strategy, marketing, entrepreneurship, information systems and operations management, management, global management, human resource management, Latin American business, international studies, and sports administration.

Admission: Applicants for admission must submit recent official scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and official transcripts for all previous academic work. All program options require at least two years of full-time professional work experience performed after receiving an acceptable bachelor’s degree, along with written essays and personal recommendations from employers. All qualified applicants to the full-time (traditional) program are asked to interview as part of the admissions process. Applicants whose native, first language is not English must submit acceptable scores from one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), IELTS (International English Language Testing System), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute program. Admission is competitive and class size is limited.

A diverse student body is seen as an important asset of the program. Accordingly, the backgrounds of students include a wide range of disciplines and cultures. With the exception of the Option B program, the curriculum assumes no previous academic work in business administration; however, enrolling students find introductory course work in statistics, calculus, and financial accounting beneficial.

For more specific information on other aspects of the program, contact the Office of Admissions, UF MBA Program, 310 Hough Hall, P.O. Box 117152, Gainesville FL 32611-7152, or visit the website, http://www.floridamba.ufl.edu.

Course work: A minimum of 48 qualified credits of course work are required for the two-year option, and one-year Option A. The one-year Option B requires a minimum of 32 credits. Credits cannot be transferred from another institution or program.

Options

Traditional MBA Two-Year Option: This 48 credit program requires 4 terms of full-time study over two academic years. Students are admitted for the fall term only; many students spend the summer between academic years working at internships. This option requires at least two years of full-time, post-undergraduate work experience as well as a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four year institution.

Traditional MBA One-Year, Option A: This 48 credit program starts in late spring/ early summer and students are expected to complete all coursework within 12 months. Successful candidates are expected to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four year institution and two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Traditional MBA One-Year, Option B: This 32 credit program starts in mid-summer and students expected to complete all course work within 10 months. Applicants to this program are required to have a bachelor’s degree in business from a four-year accredited institution (conferred within the last seven years) and at least two years of post-undergraduate work experience. Students take primarily graduate business electives during summer B, fall, and spring terms and graduate in May.

Executive MBA Program: A 20-month program for working professionals, students attend classes one extended weekend per month (Friday-Sunday). The program is divided into five terms each lasting about four months. The program starts in August, and includes a one-week two credit international experience. The international study tour is a program requirement; students travel abroad in May for a week of experiential learning through lectures or discussions with local business and government leaders. The tour will include a combination of lectures, group projects and/or site visits. This option requires eight years of post-undergraduate work experience, and students are expected to have people or project management responsibilities in their current positions.

Professional Two-Year MBA: This 27-month program starts in August and January and is designed for professionals who work full time while pursuing their degrees part time. Students attend classes one weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a one-week in-residence elective class. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Professional One-Year MBA: For students with acceptable undergraduate degrees in business (completed within seven years before starting the program), this 16-month option starts in January. Students attend classes one weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a one-week in-residence elective class. The first meeting includes a one-week, on-campus foundations review of basic course work. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet Two-Year MBA: This 27-month program starts in September and February and allows students to earn their MBA primarily through class lectures downloaded to their laptops or iPads. Students interact with faculty and classmates via e-mail, synchronous group discussion software, asynchronous class presentation software, and multimedia courseware. Students visit campus one weekend (Saturday-Sunday) every four months. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet One-Year MBA: For students with acceptable undergraduate degrees in business (completed within seven years before starting this program), this 16-month option starts in January and August and gives students and faculty the same interactive technology as the Internet Two-Year MBA. Students visit campus one weekend (Saturday-Sunday) every four months. The first meeting includes a one week, on-campus foundations review of basic course work. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Professional MBA in South Florida: This 24 month program starts during the late summer, and is designed for professionals who wish to continue working full time while pursuing their degrees part time. This program includes a one-week two credit international experience. The international study tour is a program requirement; students travel abroad in November for a week of experiential learning through lectures or discussions with local business and government leaders. The tour will include a combination of lectures, group projects, and/or site visits. Students attend classes once every three weeks (Saturday-Sunday) at the UF MBA Sunrise Center in Sunrise, Florida. This option requires two years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./M.S. in medical sciences (biotechnology) program: Concurrent studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Master of Science degrees, offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine, are in response to the needs of businesses engaged in biotechnological sciences. Both degrees can be obtained in 3 years. The program requires 1 year of science courses, 1 year of business courses, and a year devoted to research and electives in business and science. Research is done in one of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research core laboratories. Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. A student must at all times remain in good standing in both degree programs to remain in the M.B.A. program. Applicants are expected to have previous professional work experience prior to starting the MBA program.

M.B.A./Ph.D. in medical sciences program: Concurrent studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine. This 120-credit program trains research scientists to assume responsibilities as managers of biotechnical industries. Estimated time to complete both degrees is 5 to 7 years. Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both programs. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. Applicants are expected to have previous professional work experience prior to starting the MBA program.

MBA./J.D. program: A program of joint studies leading to the Master of Business Administration and Juris Doctor degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the Warrington College of Business Administration and the Levin College of Law. Current M.B.A. or J.D. students must declare their intent to apply for the second degree during their first year. Applications are then due according to admission schedules for that year. Both degrees are awarded after a 4-year course of study. Students must take both the LSAT and the GMAT before admission and meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. Applicants are expected to have previous professional work experience prior to starting the MBA program.

M.B.A./Pharm.D. program in management and pharmacy administration: A program of concurrent studies culminating in both the Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees allows students interested in both management and pharmacy administration to obtain the appropriate education in both areas. Candidates must meet the entrance requirements and follow the entrance procedures of both the Warrington College of Business Administration and the College of Pharmacy. The degrees may be granted after 5 years of study. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. Applicants are expected to have previous professional work experience prior to starting the MBA program.

M.B.A./M.I.M. program in international management: A dual degree program between the University of Florida (UF) and the American Graduate School of International Management (Thunderbird) makes it possible to earn both degrees after 3 years of study. Students start the program at UF and apply to Thunderbird in their first year. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Exchange programs: The M.B.A. program offers second-year students exchange opportunities at numerous international universities. Currently, exchange programs exist with schools in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Canada, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. For a complete list of exchange partners, see http://www.cba.ufl.edu/sb/intlprograms/uf/exchange.asp.

 Master of Education

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree program meets the need for professional personnel to serve a variety of functions required in established and emerging educational activities of modern society. A thesis is not required.

All M.Ed. programs require at least 36 credits, with at least half of these credits earned in courses in the College of Education. Up to 6 credit earned from 3000- and 4000-level courses taken outside the academic unit may be counted toward the minimum requires for the degree provided they are part of an approved plan of study. (See also General Requirements for Master’s Degrees.)

At least 16 credits must be earned while the student is enrolled as a graduate student in courses offered on the Gainesville campus of the University of Florida including registration for at least 6 credits in a single term. This requirement may deviate where distance education programs are considered.

Master of Engineering

Students may choose a thesis or non-thesis option for the Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree. To be eligible for admission to the M.E. program, students must have earned a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited college or they must complete articulation work for equivalence. Admission requirements of the Graduate School must be met. The College of Engineering may use the Fundamentals of Engineering examination in lieu of the GRE for admitting students into the non-thesis master’s degree programs. Students who do not meet the ABET requirement may be admitted to the Master of Science program (see section on Master of Arts and Master of Science).

The non-thesis M.E. degree is a 30-credit course-work-only degree (practice-oriented project or capstone course may be included in the 30 credits). At least 15 credits must be in the student’s major at the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major, courses numbered 3000 or above (not to exceed 6 credits) may be taken if they are part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required. Two 6-credit minors may be taken. At the discretion of individual engineering academic units, an oral or written examination may be required.

The thesis option requires 30 credits of course work, including up to 6 credits of 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). At least 12 credits (not counting 6971) must be in the student’s major. Courses in the major must be at the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major, up to 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required. Two 6-credit minors may be taken at the discretion of the academic unit. A comprehensive oral and/or written final examination is required.

An off-campus (distance learning) student who is a candidate for the non-thesis M.E. degree must take half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a comprehensive written examination administered by a committee from the academic unit. If the student has a minor, the committee must include a member representing that minor.

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree is offered with majors in art, creative writing, and theatre. Requirements are the same as for the Master of Arts with thesis, except the M.F.A. requires at least 60 credits (54 for creative writing), including 6 to 9 credits in 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). Students in art and theatre substitute 6973 (Individual Project) creative work in lieu of the written thesis.

Admission: Applicants requesting admission to any of the programs should have an earned baccalaureate degree in the same or a closely related field from an accredited institution. Students must fulfill the admission requirements of their disciplines and the Graduate School’s admission criteria. In cases where the undergraduate degree is not in the area chosen for graduate study, the student must demonstrate a level of achievement fully equivalent to the bachelor’s degree in the chosen graduate field. A candidate deficient in certain areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully completing appropriate courses.

Art or theatre candidates also must submit a portfolio of the creative work, or must audition, before being accepted into the program. Creative writing candidates must submit 2 short stories, 2 chapters of a novel, or 6 to 10 poems. Three years of work in residence are usually needed to complete degree requirements. If deficiencies must be removed, the residency could be longer. See the Programs Section of this catalog  for Art, English, and Theatre.

Art: The M.F.A. degree with a major in art involves advanced visual research for those who wish to attain a professional level of proficiency in studio work. Specialization is offered in the studio areas of ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and digital media. For studio work, the M.F.A. is generally the terminal degree and is often the required credential for teachers of art in colleges and universities.

In addition to the general requirements above, students must take at least 60 credits. Requirements include 42 credits in studio courses (24 in specialization, 12 in electives, and 6 in ART 6973C); 6 credits in art history; 3 credits in teaching art in higher education (required if the student is to accept a teaching assistantship); 3 credits in aesthetics, criticism, or theory; and 6 credits of electives. The College requires the student to leave documentation of thesis project work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.

Creative writing: The M.F.A. in creative writing develops writers of poetry and fiction by a series of workshops and literature seminars. Candidates are expected to produce a thesis (a manuscript of publishable poetry or fiction) at the end of the 3-year program. The degree requires 9 courses (4 workshops, 3 literature courses, and 2 electives), 3 reading tutorials, and a thesis: 48 credits in all. Students take at least 1 workshop each term. All of the literature courses cannot be in the same century. The electives may be literature seminars or workshops; 1 elective may be an approved graduate course outside the Department of English.

Theatre: The M.F.A. degree with a major in theatre is for those interested in production-oriented theatrical careers and teaching. Two specializations are offered: acting and design. The craft skills encompassed in the program are later applied in public and studio productions. The program requires 60 credits, including 18 credits of core classes, 17 credits of specialty training, an internship, and a project in lieu of thesis.

Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

The non-thesis Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) program trains students in the technical aspects of fisheries and aquatic sciences emphasizing written and oral communication of scientific information. Requirements are the same as for the Master of Science degree with the non-thesis option, except that the minimum credit requirement is 32 credits, of which at least 26 graduate credits of graded course work (at least 16 in the major), and a technical paper.  The final draft of the technical paper must be submitted to all supervisory committee members for approval at least 3 weeks before the scheduled date of the oral and written final examination.

Master of Forest Resources and Conservation

The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.) degree is for additional professional preparation rather than primary research. Requirements are the same as those listed under General Regulations for master’s degrees, except that the M.F.R.C. requires GRE scores of at least 500 verbal and 500 quantitative.

Work required: At least 32 credits of letter-graded course work with at least 12 credits of graduate course work in the major are required. A thesis is not required, but the student must complete a technical project in an appropriate field. This project may take various forms, such as a literature review, extension publication, video, training manual, or curriculum. The M.F.R.C. requires a final examination covering the candidate’s entire field of study. The student must present the work to the supervisory committee in an on-campus public forum before the final examination.

Master of Health Administration

The Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.), offered by the College of Public Health and Health Professions, trains qualified individuals to become managers and leaders of health care organizations. The degree provides a core of business and analytical skills, concepts and knowledge specific to health administration, opportunities for application and synthesis, and exposure to the field of practice. The M.H.A. program admits students only in the fall term and requires full-time study for 2 years, plus a summer internship between the first and second years. The program requires a total of 63 credits.

Master of Health Science

The Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) degree, offered by the College of Public Health and Health Professions, provides exposure to health research and meets the need for leadership personnel in established and emerging health care programs. The College currently offers a program in occupational therapy.

There are three paths to enter occupational therapy and attain the Master of Health Science degree. The 4-term thesis option emphasizes research and is the appropriate route for (but not limited to) students interested in rehabilitation science. The 3-term non-thesis option emphasizes research and advanced theories related to the practice of occupational therapy. Both options prepare leaders in the profession and require 36 credits. The third option, the distance learning program, is for working professionals to increase knowledge in emerging practice areas and leadership. See the General Regulations for requirements for all master’s degrees for further requirements.

Master of Interior Design

The Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) allows students to direct their attention to a variety of topics including design pedagogy and processes; sustainable, safe, and secure environments; creative performance and innovation; and built heritage conservation.

Work required includes at least 36 credits (no more than 6 thesis credits). Required preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work.

Master of International Construction Management

The Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.) is a non-thesis, distance education, advanced degree program with a research report/project requirement offered by the Rinker School of Building Construction. The M.I.C.M. allows students with computer and Internet access to attend classes at any time, any place and to interact with faculty and classmates via the Internet.

Admissions: Applicants for admission must have:

  • An undergraduate degree,
  • At least 5 years of meaningful, supervisory-level construction management experience,
  • Acceptable GRE scores
  • A grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale,
  • If an international student, an acceptable score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: paper=550, internet=80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77), or successful completion of the UF English Language Institute program, and
  • Sponsorship by the employer.

Work required: The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper-level construction management responsibilities in a multinational construction company. Specializations include sustainable construction, information systems, construction safety, and human resource management. In addition to 6 research-oriented graduate credits, the student selects 1 or 2 specializations and then takes the rest of the required 33 credits from the remaining courses and special electives. Students must pass a comprehensive oral and/or written examination on completing course work and the master’s research report/project.

Master of Landscape Architecture

The degree of Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is the advanced professional degree for graduates with baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture and is a first professional degree for the graduate from a non-landscape architectural background. Candidates are admitted from related and unrelated fields and backgrounds. An advanced professional life experience track is available for eligible candidates.

Work required: Candidates must complete at least 52 credits, including no more than 6 credits of thesis or project. For students without baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture, required preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work. For advanced professional life experience candidates, the minimum requirement is 30 credits, including thesis. At least 50% of all course work must be graduate courses in landscape architecture. Some areas allow a project (requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis, with permission of the academic unit’s Graduate Faculty.

Master of Latin

The Classics Department offers the non-thesis Master of Latin (M.L.) degree, a 30-credit program mainly for currently employed and/or certified teaching professionals who wish to widen their knowledge of Latin, broaden their education in the field of Classics, and enhance their professional qualifications. This degree can be attained by students in residence for fall/spring terms or by a program of summer course work at UF and by directed independent study and/or distance learning courses during the regular academic year.

Students registering during summer terms can complete the degree in 4 years by earning 6 graduate credits each summer (total = 24), plus two 3-credit independent study or distance learning courses during the intervening academic years. Those who already have some graduate credit in Latin, or who can take more credits during the year, can complete the degree more quickly.

Unlike the M.A. degree in Latin, the Master of Latin degree has no thesis requirement, does not prepare students for Ph.D. level studies, and is aimed specifically at currently employed and certified Latin teachers.

Admission: Contact the Department’s Graduate Coordinator or Distance Learning Coordinator before applying. Requirements for the admissions process are:

  • Apply to UF’s Graduate School,
  • Acceptable GRE scores,
  • Three letters of recommendation, and
  • Transcripts recording undergraduate courses (and graduate courses, if any; students must demonstrate the ability to take Latin courses at the graduate level).

Degree requirements include at least 30 credits as a UF graduate student. Of these, no more than 8 credits (grade of A, A-, B+, or B) may be transferred from institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least half of the 30 credits required should be from Latin language and literature courses (LAT or LNW courses at the 5000 level or above). UF graduate-level courses taken before admission to Graduate School (e.g., in the Latin Summer Institutes) may be applied to the 30 credits if approved by the Graduate School. The Department will work closely with individual students to determine how many previous graduate credits at UF or other institutions may be applied to this program.

The student may elect minor work in other academic units (e.g., history, philosophy, art history, religion) although there is no requirement to do so. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors may be taken with departmental permission. A GPA of 3.0 is required for minor credit and for all work counted toward the degree. All work in a minor must be approved by the supervisory committee.

Examination: The supervisory committee administers a final oral and written comprehensive examination at completion of the course work. This examination includes (1) an oral component on Roman literary tradition and (2) a written component covering (a) Latin sight translation and grammar, (b) Roman history and civilization, and if applicable (c) the minor, or minors. As preparation for this examination, the student should read the required reading list of secondary works in English.

Language requirement: The Department for this degree plan does not require, but strongly recommends, at least a reading knowledge of one (or more) of the following: German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Such study will facilitate reading important secondary works not translated into English, enhance travel, and perhaps lead to teaching opportunities in the chosen language at the secondary school level.

Master of Laws in Comparative Law

The Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law) degree is for graduates of foreign law schools who want to enhance their understanding of the American legal system and the English common law system. The program starts with Introduction to American Law, a 4-credit summer course that gives students a foundation in the American legal process. It also helps students acclimate to the College of Law and the University community before starting the academic year. During fall and spring terms, and with the director’s approval, students choose their remaining 22 credits from more than 100 Juris Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses and seminars. For admission information consult the College of Law Catalog or write to the Comparative Law Office, P.O. Box 117643, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7643.

Master of Laws in Environmental and Land Use Law

The Master of Laws in Environmental and Land Use Law degree is a one-year post-J.D. degree providing an opportunity for experienced attorneys, as well as recent law school graduates, to spend an academic year full-time on the UF campus developing in-depth expertise in environmental and land use law.

For more information about the Environmental and Land Use Law Program, contact
University of Florida Levin College of Law, Environmental and Land Use Law Office
P.O. Box 117625
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625

Phone (352-273-0777) or
E -mail to elulp@law.ufl.edu.

Master of Laws in International Taxation

The Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.I.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction for law graduates who plan to specialize in international taxation, in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, and 13 must be graduate-level international tax courses, including a research and writing course.

Master of Laws in Taxation

The Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction for law graduates who plan to specialize in federal taxation and particularly federal income taxation, in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, including a research and writing course.

Master of Music

The Master of Music (M.M.) degree is offered in music or music education. The music program offers the following concentrations: choral conducting, composition, instrumental conducting, music history and literature, ethnomusicology, music theory, performance, and sacred music. The M.M. degree prepares students for careers as teachers in studios, schools, and universities; performers; music historians; music critics; church musicians; composers; conductors; and accompanists.

Admission: Applicants should have a baccalaureate degree in music or a closely related area from an accredited institution and must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School and the College of Fine Arts. Students whose undergraduate degree is in another discipline must demonstrate a level of achievement fully acceptable for master’s level work in this discipline. Applicants normally complete at least 16 credits in music theory, 6 credits in music history, and 12 credits in performance. A candidate deficient in certain undergraduate areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully completing appropriate courses. If remedial work is needed, the residency (usually 4 terms of full-time study) may be longer. An audition is required for all students.

Work required includes at least 32 credits of course work (not counting prerequisite or deficiency courses) incorporating a core of 9 credits. The core in all emphases includes MUS 6716 (MUE 6785 in the music education program), MUT 6629, and one MUH or MUL graduate course. A thesis or creative project in lieu of thesis is required.

The College of Fine Arts reserves the right to retain student work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction. For more information, see the Programs Section of this catalog .

Master of Occupational Therapy

The non-thesis Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) degree program is for students who do not have a degree in occupational therapy, and who want to enter the field of occupational therapy. The program gives students a holistic perspective including an understanding of the philosophical and theoretical bases for practice in the current health care environment. The M.O.T. program provides a strong background in theory, assessment, and therapeutic intervention.

This 5-term program of graduate study consists of 3 terms of classroom course work and 2 terms (24 weeks) of internship. Students enter the program after completing a bachelor’s degree. The M.O.T. degree is awarded after completing 58 credits. Students must receive at least a B (3.00 truncated) on all course work and satisfactory evaluations on all clinical fieldwork.

Master of Public Health

The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) is a non-thesis degree program that prepares students to become effective public health practitioners, scientists, and educators. Graduates can contribute to the health of the local, national, and international communities through advancing public health knowledge and by designing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that prevent disease and promote health. Students have the opportunity to develop skills in 1 of 6 public health concentration areas:

  • Biostatistics: Applying quantitative and analytical methods in public health research and evaluation
  • Environmental health: Assessing risk levels and protecting the public from environmental threats to health
  • Epidemiology: Studying the distribution and determinants of health In populations and communities
  • Public health management and policy: Providing leadership in public health administration and developing policies to promote the public’s health
  • Public health practice: Developing breadth in the field of public health by studying 2 or more of the other concentration areas
  • Social and behavioral sciences: Exploring the unique issues faced by diverse groups and populations and acquiring skills to achieve social and behavioral change.

The M.P.H. degree program is a 48-credit program for individuals with bachelor’s degrees. Those with prior terminal degrees in health-related fields may take the M.P.H. in an accelerated 42-credit format. Several collaborative programs with professional and graduate degrees are available, including D.V.M./M.P.H., J.D./M.P.H., and Pharm.D./M.P.H. A combined degree program for seniors and a 15-credit certificate program also are offered. For additional information, visit http://www.mph.ufl.edu.

Admission: Applicants with any undergraduate major are considered for the program as long as they meet the Graduate School admission requirements and their interests match the program’s philosophy and curriculum.

Work required: In the 48-credit program, students take 16 credits of core public health course work and 5-8 credits of internship. Internships are designed to promote competency in the concentration area and contribute to the student’s career goals. The remaining 24-27 credits include required and elective course work in the concentration area chosen by the student. Specific course requirements vary by concentration area.

Students who have a relevant terminal degree in a health-related field may be eligible for the 42-credit accelerated program, pending M.P.H. admissions committee approval. This program requires completion of 16 credits of core public health course work, 21 credits of concentration course work, and a 5-credit internship.

Master of Science in Architectural Studies

Admission: The Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) is a nonprofessional, research degree for students with undergraduate degrees in any field of study who wish to undertake advanced studies and research in architectural specialties. Specialization is offered in environmental technology, architectural preservation, urban design, history, and theory.

Work required includes at least 35 credits of course work incorporating up to 6 credits of ARC 6971 (Research for Master’s Thesis). Most course work should be in the School of Architecture, but multidisciplinary electives in planning, history, law, engineering, art history, and real estate are encouraged. Students also may enroll in one of the School’s off-campus programs in Nantucket, in the Caribbean, in Hong Kong, or in Vicenza. A thesis is required.

Requirements for level and distribution of credits, supervisory committee, and final examination are the same as for the Master of Arts and Master of Science with thesis.

Master of Science in Nursing

The master’s degree prepares nurses for advanced practice, clinical nurse specialist, or to be a clinical nurse leader. The graduate nursing core includes nursing theory, research, statistics, health policy, ethics, finance, and health promotion. The advanced practice core includes specific theory and clinical courses with relevant clinical experiences. 

The College offers the master’s degree and post-master’s certification for nurse midwifery and the following nurse practitioner roles: adult acute care, adult, family, pediatric, and neonatal.

Additional offerings include

• Psychiatric/mental clinical nurse specialists/nurse practitioners
• Clinical Nurse Leader

Graduates are eligible for Florida licensure and national certification. To be considered for the M.S.N. program, students must meet the following minimum requirements:

• Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree with an upper-division grade point average of 3.0 or higher from a CCNE or NLN AC accredited program

• A score of 500 or higher on each of the verbal and quantitative sections in the prior version of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. In the new version of the GRE a minimum score of 153 in the verbal section and 144 in the quantitative section. Analytical writing section is optional.

• Eligibility for licensure to practice as a registered nurse in the state of Florida

For application materials: http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/prospective/prospective_msn_application_process.shtml 

Master of Statistics

The Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) degree requires at least 36 credits including at least 30 graduate credits in the major. Courses are selected in consultation with the supervisory committee chair and approved by the supervisory committee. Students must pass two examinations: (1) a first-year examination, given by a committee designated for the purpose, on material covered in statistics courses for first-year graduate students and (2) a final oral examination consisting of a presentation by the student on a statistical topic not covered in depth in the regular course work. The student should consult with his/her adviser to choose a topic, and present a written report on that topic to the supervisory committee at least 1 week before the examination date. A typical report is 8 to 10 pages. During and after the presentation, the student’s committee may ask questions related to the topic of the presentation and related to other material covered in the student’s program of study.

Master of Sustainable Development Practice

The Master of Sustainable Development Practice (MDP) at the University of Florida is focused on training development practitioners capable of addressing development challenges in creative and dynamic ways. The UF MDP bridges the academic and development pillars of natural sciences, social sciences, health sciences and integrated management skills into a vigorous and innovative program curriculum.

The MDP Degree requires 45 credits of course work, including 33 core credits and 12 electives, the latter through which a student focuses on a specialization. The MDP Program is a non-thesis degree, wherein each student must successfully complete a set of requirements. These include, among others, a summer field practicum, the development of a poster presented in a public poster session, a final practicum report approved by their committee, and a public presentation and private defense with committee members of the final report. All students will be expected to meet defined learning outcome objectives, integrating knowledge, skills and desired professional behavior.

All admission and graduation requirements of the Graduate School must be met. Students are required to develop a study plan approved by the MDP program Graduate Coordinator. Please visit the MDP Program website for additional information on the MDP degree and curriculum http://www.africa.ufl.edu/mdp/index.html.
 

Requirements for Doctoral Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is a research degree and is granted on evidence of general proficiency, distinctive attainment in a special field, and particularly on ability for independent investigation as demonstrated in a dissertation presenting original research with a high degree of literary skill. Consequently, doctoral programs are more flexible and varied than those leading to other graduate degrees. The Graduate Council does not specify what courses are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. General requirements: the program should be unified in relation to a clear objective, the program should have the considered approval of the student’s entire supervisory committee, and the program should include an appropriate number of credits of doctoral research.

Course Requirements

Course requirements for doctoral degrees vary from field to field and from student to student. In all fields, the Ph.D. degree requires at least 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree. All master’s degrees counted in the minimum must be earned in the last 7 years.

Transfer of credit: No more than 30 credits of a master’s degree from another institution will be transferred to a doctoral program. If a student holds a master’s degree in a discipline different from the doctoral program, the master’s work will not be counted in the program unless the academic unit petitions the Dean of the Graduate School. All courses beyond the master’s degree taken at another university to be applied to the Ph.D. degree must be taken at an institution offering the doctoral degree and must be approved for graduate credit by the Graduate School of the University of Florida. All courses to be transferred must be graduate-level, letter-graded with a grade of B or better and must be demonstrated to relate directly to the degree being sought. All such transfer requests must be made by petition of the supervisory committee no later than the third term of Ph.D. study. The total number of credits (including 30 for a prior master’s degree) that may be transferred cannot exceed 45, and in all cases the student must complete the qualifying examination at the University of Florida. In addition, any prior graduate credits earned at UF (e.g., a master’s degree in the same or a different discipline) may be transferred into the doctoral program at the discretion of the supervisory committee and by petition to the Graduate School. The petition must show how the prior course work is relevant to the current degree.

Major: A Ph.D. student does the major work in an academic unit specifically approved for offering doctoral courses and supervising dissertations. See Graduate Programs. At least a B (3.00 truncated) is needed for courses included in the major.

Minor: Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major. If an academic unit contributes more than one course (as specified in the curriculum inventory and/or the Graduate Catalog) to the major, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing academic unit. A 3.00 (truncated) GPA is required for minor credit. 

With the supervisory committee’s approval, the student may choose one or more minor fields. If one minor is chosen, the supervisory committee member representing the minor suggests 12 to 24 credits of courses numbered 5000 or higher as preparation for a qualifying examination. If two minors are chosen, each must include at least 8 credits. Competency in the minor is demonstrated by written examination by the minor academic unit, or by the oral qualifying examination.  

Leave of Absence

A doctoral student who ceases to be registered at UF for more than 1 term needs prior written approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence for a stated period of time. This approved leave is kept on file in the student’s departmental record. It does not need Graduate School approval. The student must reapply for admission on returning. See Readmission and Catalog Year.

Supervisory Committee

Supervisory committees are nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the dean of the college concerned, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student starts doctoral work and no later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-time study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees.

Duties and responsibilities of the supervisory committee:

  • Inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. This does not absolve the student from responsibility for being informed about these regulations. See General Regulations.
  • Meet immediately after appointment to review the student’s qualifications and discuss and approve a program of study.
  • Meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the plans for carrying it out.
  • Give the student a yearly evaluation letter in addition to S/U grades earned for research courses 7979 and 7980. The chair writes this letter after consulting with the supervisory committee.
  • Conduct the qualifying examination (or participate in it, if administered by the academic unit).
  • Meet when at least half the work on the dissertation is complete, to review procedure, progress, and expected results; and to make suggestions for completion.
  • Meet with the student when the dissertation is completed and conduct the final oral examination to assure that the dissertation is a piece of original research and a contribution to knowledge. The supervisory committee chair or cochair must be present with the candidate for the examination. All other committee members may attend remotely. Only the actual supervisory committee may sign the ETD Signature Page, and they must approve the dissertation unanimously. See Examinations in General Regulations.

Membership: The supervisory committee for a doctoral candidate comprises at least four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including the chair, must be from the academic unit recommending the degree. At least one member serves as external member and should be from a different educational discipline, with no ties to the home academic unit. One regular member may be from the home academic unit or another unit.

If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee includes at least one Graduate Faculty member representing the student’s minor. If the student elects more than one minor, each minor area must be represented on the supervisory committee. Therefore, committees for students with two minors must have a minimum of five members.

Special appointments: People without Graduate Faculty status may be made official members of a student’s supervisory committee through the special appointment process. Appropriate candidates for special appointments include

  • Individuals from outside UF with specific expertise who contribute to a graduate student’s program of study
  • Tenure-track faculty not yet qualified for Graduate Faculty status
  • Nontenure-track faculty or staff at UF who do not qualify for Graduate Faculty status

Limitations for special appointments:

  • They do not hold Graduate Faculty appointments
  • They have a special appointment that is specific only to an individual student’s committee
  • They may not serve as a supervisory committee chair, cochair, external member, or minor representative.

The student’s supervisory committee chair requests the special appointment, briefly explaining what the special appointment contributes to the supervisory committee. A special appointment is made for a specific supervisory committee. If a student changes to a new degree or major and the committee chair wishes to include the special member on the new supervisory committee, another request must be submitted to the Graduate School for the new committee.

External member:

  • Represents the interests of the Graduate School and UF
  • Knows Graduate Council policies
  • Serves as an advocate for the student at doctoral committee activities.

If the academic unit’s committee activity conflicts with broader University policies or practices, the external member is responsible for bringing such conflicts to the attention of the appropriate governing body. Therefore, the external member is prohibited from holding any official interest in the doctoral candidate’s major academic unit. Faculty holding joint, affiliate, courtesy, or adjunct appointments in the degree-granting academic unit cannot be external members on a student’s committee.

Minor member: The Graduate Faculty member who represents a minor on a student’s committee may be appointed as the external member if he/she does not have a courtesy graduate appointment in the student’s major academic unit.

Cochair: To substitute for the chair of the committee at any examinations, the cochair must be in the same academic unit as the candidate.

Retired faculty: Graduate Faculty members who retire may continue their service on supervisory committees for 1 year. With approval of the academic unit, retired faculty may continue serving on existing or new committees beyond this period.

Substituting members at qualifying and final examination: If a supervisory committee member cannot be present at the student’s final defense, a Graduate Faculty member in the same academic area may substitute for the absent committee member. The substitute should sign the Final Examination form on the left side, in the space provided for committee members, noting the name of the absent member.

The chair of the student’s major academic unit also must indicate the reason for the absence and state that the absent member agreed to this substitution at the final examination.

The substitute should not sign the ETD signature page. The original committee member must sign.

The student and chair or cochair should be present for the oral defense; however, other committee members may elect to attend remotely, with approval by the other committee members, using modern communication technology to be present rather than being physically present at the defense.

No substitutes are allowed for the chair or external member of the committee. Changes to the supervisory committee may be entered online in GIMS before the qualifying examination.

The Graduate Council wants each supervisory committee to function as a University committee (not a departmental committee), applying University-wide standards to the various doctoral degrees. For complete information on the appointment process, consult the Graduate Council Policy Manual, http://gradschool.ufl.edu/archived-files/policy-manual-archived-copy.html (Chapter VIII).

Language Requirement

Any foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is established by the major academic unit with approval of the college. The student should check with the graduate coordinator of the appropriate academic unit for specific information. The foreign language departments offer classes for graduate students starting to study a language. See the current Schedule of Courses for available languages. All candidates must be able to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee.

Campus Residence Requirement

Beyond the first 30 credits counted toward the doctoral degree, students must complete 30 credits enrolled at the University of Florida campus or at an approved branch station of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations or the Graduate Engineering and Research Center. An academic unit or college may establish and monitor its own more-stringent requirement as desired.

Qualifying Examination

All Ph.D. candidates must take the qualifying examination. It may be taken during the third term of graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree.

The student must be registered in the term the qualifying examination is given.

The examination, prepared and evaluated by the full supervisory committee or the major and minor academic units, is both written and oral and covers the major and minor subjects. Except for allowed substitutions, all members of the supervisory committee must attend the oral part. The student and chair or co-chair must be in the same physical location. With approval of the entire committee, other committee members may attend remotely using modern technology.  At this time the supervisory committee is responsible for deciding whether the student is qualified to continue work toward a Ph.D. degree.

If a student fails the qualifying examination, the Graduate School should be notified. A re-examination may be requested, but it must be recommended by the supervisory committee. At least one term of additional preparation is needed before re-examination.

Time lapse: Between the oral part of the qualifying examination and the date of the degree there must be at least 2 terms. The term the qualifying examination is passed is counted, if the examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.

Registration in Research Courses

Advanced Research (7979) is open to doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy (classified as 7 and 8). Students enrolled in 7979 during the term they qualify for candidacy will stay in this registration unless the academic unit elects to change their enrollment to Research for Doctoral Dissertation (7980), which is reserved for doctoral students admitted to candidacy (classified as 9).

Admission to Candidacy

A graduate student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degree when the student is granted formal admission to candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the student’s supervisory committee, the academic unit chair, the college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The approval must be based on:

  • The academic record of the student
  • The supervisory committee’s opinion on overall fitness for candidacy
  • An approved dissertation topic
  • A qualifying examination as described above

The student should apply for admission to candidacy as soon as the qualifying examination is passed and a dissertation topic is approved by the student’s supervisory committee.

Dissertation

Each doctoral candidate must prepare and present a dissertation that shows independent investigation and that is acceptable in form and content to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, using the Graduate School’s format requirements. The student and supervisory committee are responsible for level of quality and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate School Editorial Office, as agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to review theses and dissertations for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as needed.

Doctoral dissertation requirements: Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the dissertation should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the dissertation, before attempting to make a first submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the ASC Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards, required for an editorial review

Format requirements: 
graduateschool.ufl.edu/files/etd-guide.pdf

Checklist:
http://graduateschool.ufl.edu/files/checklist-dissertation.pdf

Graduate School Editorial Office:
http://graduateschool.ufl.edu/graduation/thesis-and-dissertation

Application Support Center:
https://asc.helpdesk.ufl.edu/

Gatorlink e-mail requirement: UF requires all students to maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail.

Dissertation First Submission: Before presentation to the Editorial Office, the thesis should be virtually complete and completely formatted (not in a draft format). Students must be completely familiar with the format requirements of the Graduate School and should work with one of the consultants in the Application Support Center, to troubleshoot the dissertation, before attempting to make submission to the editors in the Graduate School Editorial Office.  Students who fail to first meet with one of the Lab Consultants often find their document rejected upon First Submission to the Editorial Office, for not meeting the minimum submission standards required for an editorial review

Should the document pass the submission requirements and appear acceptable for review, the Editorial Office will e-mail the student, using their Gatorlink email address, confirming the submission, and responding with an acceptance e-mail. Should the document not pass first submission requirements, a denial e-mail will instead be sent, advising the student of their options at that time.  This notice must be addressed immediately.  Once a successful first submission has been achieved and the document has been reviewed by one of the Graduate School’s editors, another e-mail is sent, providing editorial feedback to the student and committee chair.  The student is responsible for retrieving the dissertation, review comments, and resolving any deficits related to the format requirements. Students should promptly make all required changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf for Editorial Final Submission: After changes have been made to the satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page is submitted electronically to the Graduate School Editorial Office, via the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS). This must be completed by the Editorial Office’s Final Submission Deadline.  Once submitted, the student should upload and submit the final pdf of the electronic thesis, using the Editorial Document Management (EDM) system.  The document will undergo a final review by one of the Graduate School Representatives. The Editorial Office ensures that the format is acceptable, that all indicated changes were made, and that all of the hyperlinks work within the document. The Graduate School Representative then e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD. If accepted, no further changes are allowed.  If changes are still required, the student should resubmit the corrected document as soon as possible. All documents must be confirmed with final approval emails from the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Clearance deadline. This deadline is firm, and no exceptions can be granted. When all changes have been made and approved, the Editorial Office will email the Committee Chair and the student with a message, indicating the student has achieved Editorial Final Clearance with the Graduate School’s Editorial Office.  

Editorial Final Clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final thesis must be confirmed as accepted, by email, by 5:00 p.m. on this deadline. This deadline only applies, if all other posted deadlines for the term have been appropriately met.  Because there are hundreds of students in this process, most students complete all requirements well in advance. 

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure they have achieved Final Clearance status by the Final Clearance Deadline for the term in which they intend to graduate. This can be confirmed via GIMS.

Publication of dissertation: All dissertation students must pay a $25 microfilm fee for traditional publication and microfilming fees through UMI/Proquest, even if they elect not to send the dissertation to UMI for publication. This charge will appear as a hold on the student record in ISIS after making first submission to the Graduate School Editorial Office. All dissertation students also must sign a microfilm agreement form. This form is provided to the student at the defense. This form is signed by the student; it is delivered to the Graduate School Editorial Office by the Final Submission Deadline for the intended term of degree award. Students who began their graduate program in Fall 2001 or later must submit their final dissertations electronically (not on paper).

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having written the dissertation. A copyright page should be included immediately after the title page to indicate this. The Editorial Office does not accept copyright registration requests. Registering copyright is not required and does not benefit most students. Any students who wish to register a copyright can do so themselves (http://www.copyright.gov).

Dissertation language: Dissertations must be written in English, except for students pursuing degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in these disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic language. A foreign language dissertation should have the Acknowledgments, Abstract, and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1 should also be in English.

Journal articles: Dissertations may include journal articles as chapters, if all copyright considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 should be a general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last chapter should be general conclusions, again tying everything together into a unified whole. Any chapter representing a journal article needs a footnote at the bottom of the first page of the chapter: “Reprinted with permission from … ” giving the source, just as it appears in the list of references. The dissertation should have only 1 abstract and 1 reference list.

Guidelines for Restriction on Release of Dissertations

Research performed at the University can effectively contribute to the education of our students and to the body of knowledge that is our heritage only if the results of the research are published freely and openly. Conflicts can develop when it is in the interests of sponsors of university research to restrict such publication. When such conflicts arise, the University must decide what compromises it is willing to accept, taking into account the relevant circumstances.

Final Examination

While submitting the dissertation and completing all other work prescribed for the degree, the candidate is given a final examination, oral or written or both, by the supervisory committee, on campus. The candidate and the supervisory committee chair or cochair must be physically present together at the same location. With approval of the entire committee, other members may attend the defense remotely, using modern communication technology.The defense should be no more than 6 months before degree award. All forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate and the supervisory committee chair sign the UF Publishing Agreement Form, while the entire supervisory committee signs the ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report. If dissertation changes are requested, the supervisory committee chair or his or her designee may hold the ETD Signature Page until all are satisfied with the dissertation. However, this form must be submitted electronically, via GIMS, by the Final Submission Deadline for the Graduate School Editorial Office, during the term of intended degree award.

Satisfactory performance on this examination and adherence to all Graduate School regulations outlined above complete the requirements for the degree.

Time limitation: All work for the doctorate must be completed within 5 calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must be repeated.

Doctor of Audiology

The College Public Health and Health Professions offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Audiology. The Au.D. degree is awarded after a 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not required. The program leading to the Au.D. degree is administered by the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, the college, and the Graduate School.

Admission: To be considered for the Au.D. program, students must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • A 3.00 junior-senior undergraduate grade point average and a program specific acceptable score on the GRE General Test,
  • Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of recommendation, and
  • Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through a personal statement describing the motivation and skills applicable to graduate study and the profession of audiology.

Course requirements include 110 credits for students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree awarded by an accredited institution consisting of  at least 70 credits of didactic instruction, 30 credits of applied practicum, and 3 credits of audiology research.

A 70-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned master’s degree in audiology from an accredited institution.

A 45-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned master’s from an accredited institution, certification and/or licensure in audiology, and at least 3 years of full-time experience in audiology.

Comprehensive examination, required for all Au.D. candidates, may be taken during the eighth term of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. Both written and oral, this examination is prepared and evaluated by the supervisory committee, which is responsible for determining whether the student is qualified to continue work toward the degree by completing the clinical residency.

Doctor of Education

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree offers advanced professional training and academic preparation for the highest levels of educational practice. Programs are available in the School of Teaching and Learning, the School of Special Education, School Psychology, and Early Childhood Studies, and the School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education.

A minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree (master’s degrees included must be in the last 7 years) is required. Course requirements vary with the academic unit and with the student’s plan for research and/or professional pursuit. With the approval of the supervisory committee, the student may choose one or more minor fields of study. The Ed.D. requires a qualifying examination and a dissertation.

See Requirements for the Ph.D. for information on transfer of credit, minors, leave of absence, supervisory committee, language requirement, campus residence requirement, qualifying and final examinations, admission to candidacy, dissertation, and certification. These statements apply to both the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

The College of Nursing offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.). The program prepares advanced practice nurses with the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in today’s complex health care environment and produces advanced practice nurses with educational background comparable to health care practitioners in other fields. 

Admission 

To be considered for the D.N.P. program, students must meet the following minimum requirements:

• A bachelor of science in nursing degree for the BSN/DNP program or a master’s degree in nursing for the post master’s DNP program from a CCNE or NLN AC accredited program.  

• A GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.  

• A score of 500 or higher on each of the verbal and quantitative sections in the prior version of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. In the new version of the GRE a minimum score of 153 in the verbal section and 144 in the quantitative section. Analytical writing section is optional. 

• Current licensure (or eligibility) in the state of Florida

Program of study

The D.N.P. program consists of 93 credits that can be completed in 8 semesters of full-time study or 14 semesters of part-time study. Students who already have an M.S.N. degree are able to satisfy the requirements of the D.N.P. curriculum upon completion of 48 credits.  

Doctor of Plant Medicine

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers an interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.). The D.P.M. degree is awarded after a 3- to 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not required. The program leading to the D.P. M. degree is administered by the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and the Graduate School.

Admission: Students must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • B.S. or B.A. degree, preferably in biological, agricultural, or health science. 
  • A 3.00 grade point average in upper-division courses.
  • A program specific acceptable score on the GRE General Test.
  • Applicants from countries where English is not the native language must also achieve a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: paper=550, web= 80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute program.
  • Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of recommendation.
  • Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through personal statements briefly describing their backgrounds, reasons, and career goals for studying plant medicine.

Course requirements: Students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree must earn 120 credits. This includes at least 90 credits of course work and 30 credits of internship. Students entering the program with a master’s degree in a related area may be allowed to transfer up to 30 credits in graduate courses corresponding to those required by the plant medicine program.

Comprehensive examination: Both written and oral comprehensive examinations are required of all D.P.M. students. The written examination has three sections: entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science. Faculty from the appropriate disciplines are appointed by the Program Director to develop and grade the final written examination, working in concert with faculty who teach courses required for the D.P.M. degree. The three sections of the written exam may be taken independently during the student’s last three semesters in the program at the discretion of the supervisory committee and after completion of all course work and internships. After a student passes all three sections of the final written examination (80% or higher is considered a passing grade), the supervisory committee administers an oral examination that tests the student’s ability to diagnose and manage plant health problems. A student who fails to pass a comprehensive examination may retake it within 3 months.

Specialized Degrees

Engineer

For those engineers who need additional technical depth and diversification in their education beyond the master’s degree, the College of Engineering offers the degree of Engineer (Eng.). This degree requires at least 30 credits of graduate work beyond the master’s degree. It is not to be considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D. degree. The student’s objective after the master’s degree should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer degree.

Admission to the program: Students must have completed a master’s degree in engineering and apply for admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida. The master’s degree is regarded as the foundation for the degree of Engineer. The master’s degree must be based on the candidate having a bachelor’s degree in engineering from an ABET-accredited curriculum or having taken sufficient articulation course work to meet the minimum requirements specified by ABET.

Course and residence requirements: Total registration in an approved program must include at least 30 graduate credits beyond the master’s degree. This minimum requirement must be earned through the University of Florida. The last 30 credits must be completed within 5 calendar years.

Supervisory committee: Each student admitted to the program needs a supervisory committee with at least 3 members of the Graduate Faculty (2 from the major academic unit, and at least 1 from a supporting academic unit). In addition, every effort should be made to have a representative from industry as an external adviser for the student’s program.

This committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted to Graduate School and no later than the end of the second term of study.

This committee informs the student of all regulations pertaining to the degree program. The committee is nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.

The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. If a thesis or report is required, the committee will approve the proposed thesis or report and the plans for carrying it out. The thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School. The committee will also conduct the final examination on campus when the plan of study is completed.

Plan of study: Each plan of study is developed on an individual basis for each student. Thus, there are no specific requirements for the major or minor; each student is considered individually. If the plan of study includes a thesis, the student may register for 6 to 12 credits of 6972 (Research for Engineer’s Thesis).

Thesis: The thesis should represent performance at a level above that ordinarily associated with the master’s degree. It should clearly be an original contribution; this may take the form of scientific research, a design project, or an industrial project approved by the supervisory committee. Work on the thesis may be conducted in an industrial or governmental laboratory under conditions stipulated by the supervisory committee.

Final examination: After the student completes all work on the plan of study, the supervisory committee conducts a final comprehensive oral and/or written examination (for thesis students, this also involves defending the thesis).

Specialist in Education

An Ed.S. program develops competencies needed for a professional specialization. Specializations are offered in the School of Teaching and Learning, the School of Special Education, School Psychology, and Early Childhood Studies, and the School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education. Ed.S. applicants must apply and be admitted to UF’s Graduate School. All work for the degree, including transferred credit, must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

The Ed.S. degree is awarded on completing a planned program with at least 72 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree or at least 36 credits beyond the master’s degree. All credits accepted for the program must contribute to the unity and the stated objective of the total program.

Students are tested (no more than 6 months before graduation) by written and oral examination. A thesis is not required; however, each program includes a research component relevant to the intended profession. With the academic unit’s approval, course work taken as part of the specialist program may count toward a doctoral degree.

Students who enter the program with an appropriate master’s degree from another accredited institution must complete at least 36 credits of post-master’s study to meet the following requirements:

  • At least 36 credits in graduate-level courses
  • At least 12 credits in graduate-level professional education courses

Students who enter the program with a bachelor’s degree only must (during the 72-credit program) meet these requirements in addition to the requirements of the Master of Education degree or its equivalent.

Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work, earned with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include no more than 9 credits from institution/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at UF. Credits transferred from other universities are applied toward meeting the degree requirements, but the grades earned are not computed in the student’s grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the student’s supervisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for the Ed.S. degree must be made during the student’s first term of enrollment in the Graduate School. The supervisory committee is responsible for basing acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established criteria for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.

Students are tested (no more than 6 months before graduation) by written and oral examination. A thesis is not required; however, each program includes a research component relevant to the intended profession. With the academic unit’s approval, course work taken as part of the specialist program may count toward a doctoral degree. 

Nontraditional Programs

Concurrent Graduate Programs

Any student interested in pursuing two master’s degrees in two different programs or two master’s degrees in the same program concurrently should discuss the proposed study with Graduate Student Records (392-4643, 106 Grinter) before applying. Written approval is needed from each academic unit and the Graduate School Dean. The student must be officially admitted to both programs through regular procedures. No more than 9 credits from the first program may be applied toward the second. Contact the academic unit(s) for details.

Joint Degree Programs

A joint degree program leads to a graduate degree and a professional degree. Normally 12 credits of professional courses count toward the graduate degree and 12 credits of graduate courses count toward the professional degree. Individual academic units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate. Joint programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

To participate in a joint program, a student must be admitted to both programs. Enrollment in one program may precede enrollment in the other according to timelines set by the program. During the term the student is graduating, registration is required (at least 3 credits fall or spring, or 2 credits summer). This course work must be credit that applies toward the graduate degree requirements. See graduate coordinator for details.

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

UF offers a number of bachelor’s/master’s programs for superior students. In these programs, 12 credits of graduate-level courses are counted for both degrees. See Transfer of Credit for requirements. For admission requirements and available programs, contact the academic unit.

State University System Programs

Traveling Scholar program: By mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the home and host institutions, traveling scholars’ admission requirements are waived and their earned credits are guaranteed acceptance. Traveling scholars are normally limited to 1 term on the host campus, and it cannot be their final term. The program offers special resources on another campus that are not available on the student’s home campus. To participate, graduate students need prior approval from their graduate coordinator, their supervisory committee chair, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Interested students should contact Graduate Student Records, 106 Grinter Hall.

Cooperative degree programs: In certain degree programs, faculty from other universities in the State University System hold Graduate Faculty status at UF. In those approved areas, the intellectual resources of these Graduate Faculty members are available to students at UF.