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    University of Florida
   
 
  Jul 22, 2017
 
 
    
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2013-2014 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG/PREVIOUS EDITION]

Graduate Majors and Concentrations


The following majors+ are offered by the University of Florida Graduate School.  Graduate concentrations+ appear in parentheses following the major; additional interdisciplinary and/or multi-college concentrations+ follow the individual college’s listings.  For further definitions, see below.+

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Go to information for College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

Warrington College of Business Administration

Go to information for Warrington College of Business Administration.

College of Dentistry

Go to information for College of Dentistry.

College of Design, Construction, and Planning

Go to information for College of Design, Construction, and Planning.

College of Education

Go to information for College of Education.

College of Engineering

Go to information for College of Engineering.

College of Fine Arts

Go to information for College of Fine Arts.

College of Health and Human Performance

Go to information for College of Health and Human Performance.

College of Journalism and Communications

Go to information for College of Journalism and Communications.

Fredric G. Levin College of Law

Go to information for Fredric G. Levin College of Law.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Go to information for College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

College of Medicine

Go to information for College of Medicine.

College of Nursing

Go to information for College of Nursing.

College of Pharmacy

Go to information for College of Pharmacy.

College of Public Health and Health Professions

Go to information for College of Public Health and Health Professions.

College of Veterinary Medicine

Go to information for College of Veterinary Medicine.
  

Interdisciplinary Concentrations

Agroforestry
Animal Molecular and Cell Biology 
Clinical and Translational Science
Geographic Information Systems
Historic Preservation
Hydrologic Sciences
Quantitative Finance
Sustainable Architecture
Sustainable Design 
Tropical Conservation and Development
Wetland Sciences
Women’s and Gender Studies 

Interdisciplinary Graduate Concentrations

A number of graduate programs offer interdisciplinary enhancements in the form of concentrations, field research , or certificates . The following programs offer interdisciplinary study leading to a concentration or minor, whether offered by a single college or by multiple colleges. Please follow individual links within the Majors Section  of this catalog or contact the programs directly for further information.  


 Agroforestry

The agroforestry interdisciplinary concentration is administered through the School of Forest Resources and Conservation. It offers facilities for interdisciplinary graduate education (M.S., Ph.D.) by combining course work and research around a thematic field focusing on agroforestry, especially in the context of tropical land use. Students seeking admission to the concentration need a degree in a relevant field such as agronomy, forestry, horticulture, soil science, or social sciences. They should apply to the School of Forest Resources and Conservation or another academic unit that closely represents their background and interest. Course work may be chosen from several related disciplines. Thesis research can be undertaken in Florida or overseas. Degrees are awarded through the academic units the candidates are enrolled in.

In conjunction with the graduate degree, a student can earn a concentration or minor in agroforestry by fulfilling certain requirements. Students who have a primary interest in agroforestry and undertake graduate research on an agroforestry topic can seek the concentration. Those who have an active interest and some training in agroforestry, but do not conduct graduate research on an agroforestry topic, can earn a minor. Candidates meeting the requirements can have Concentration in Agroforestry or Minor in Agroforestry appear on their transcripts.

Each option requires completing FNR 5335 (Agroforestry) and an appropriate number of approved supporting courses. These courses should be distributed over at least two academic units outside the major to prepare the student to function in multidisciplinary teams and to associate with professionals from other disciplines. Students whose background is in biology are encouraged to take social science courses, and vice versa.

For a student with a concentration or minor in agroforestry, at least one member of the supervisory committee should represent agroforestry. The Agroforestry Program Advisory Committee requires this member to counsel the student on selecting courses and the research topic.

For more information, contact the Agroforestry Program Leader, 330 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Phone (352) 846-0880, Fax (352) 846-1277, E-mail pknair@ufl.edu.

Animal Molecular and Cell Biology

The interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular and cell biology (AMCB) gives graduate students in the animal and veterinary sciences an understanding of principles of molecular and cell biology as applied to animal health and production. It emphasizes participation in molecular and cell biology research and provides an intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines. The AMCB gives graduate students access to the diverse research facilities needed to study cellular and molecular biology, reproductive biology, virology, immunology, and endocrinology. Facilities exist for recombinant DNA research, experimental surgery, in vitro culture of cells, tissue and organ explants, embryo manipulation, vaccine production, and recombinant protein engineering.

Ph.D. degrees are awarded by participating academic units, with an interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular and cell biology. Applicants need a strong background in animal or veterinary sciences. Graduate degree programs are designed by each student’s supervisory committee, headed by the member who represents AMCB. All students must complete a core curriculum, may obtain cross-disciplinary training through rotations in laboratories of participating faculty, and may participate in the AMCB seminar series.

Requirements for admission to AMCB are the same as for the faculty adviser’s academic unit and college.

Note that typically students interested in education through the AMCB enroll in the AMCB graduate program rather than the AMCB interdisciplinary concentration. For more information, contact Dr. Peter J. Hansen, Department of Animal Sciences,

pjhansen@ufl.edu

.

Clinical and Translational Science

This unique concentration in the Master of Science program in medical sciences was developed by an interdisciplinary faculty to provide sound didactic background in the foundations of clinical research. Core course requirements cover study design, data analysis, ethical conduct of research, epidemiology, manuscript and abstract writing, and grant writing. Additional electives in specific fields may be taken from other concentrations or programs. A research thesis designed and conducted with a clinical research mentor is required. 

For clinically trained M.D.s and other doctoral-level health professionals, the M.S. concentration in clinical and translational science (MS-CTS) may be part of a more-complete training experience in clinical research offered through the College of Medicine as the Advanced Postgraduate Program in Clinical Investigation (APPCI).

For more information: 
Dr. Marian Limacher
Program Director 
P.O. Box 100277
Health Science Center
Gainesville, FL 32610   

http://www.ctsi.ufl.edu/education/programs/ph-d-students/cts-interdisciplinary-concentration/

Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) revolutionized the way land features are located, measured, inventoried, managed, planned, and studied. GIS provides theories and methods for measuring location and topography, physical and biological attributes, and distribution of cultural components through data storage, analysis, modeling, mapping, and data display.

GIS applications are diverse. They include determining the suitability of land for different uses, planning future land uses, setting cadastral boundaries for the purpose of property recognition and taxation and regulation, analyzing land and land-cover for both resource inventories and scientific studies, and siting commercial enterprises.

Users and producers of GIS include engineers, geographers, planners, biologists and ecologists, land resource managers, archaeologists, sociologists, public health professionals, medical researchers, property tax assessors, law enforcement officers, land-development companies, utility companies,  and retail stores. Undergraduate and graduate students who learn to use GIS technology are in high demand and so start at higher salaries than their non-GIS peers. As a result the GIS community at the University of Florida developed the Interdisciplinary Concentration for Geographic Information Systems (ICGIS).

The ICGIS integrates existing GIS resources on campus, for graduate students, in response to changing regulatory environments in institutions and governments at all levels. This concentration established a standard set of courses and activities that allow graduate students to become experts in creating, studying, and using geographic information. Such graduates are in strong positions to meet future regulatory requirements for certification as professionals. Structurally, the ICGIS established a five-category curriculum within the standard M.S., M.A., M.E., or Ph.D. requirements. Completing the GIS concentration is officially recognized by statements on transcripts and a certificate.

For more information, contact Dr. Scot E. Smith, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110565, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-4990 , E-mail sesmith@ifas.ufl.edu

Historic Preservation

Historic preservation is the safeguarding of all cultural heritage: tangible and intangible. The College of Design, Construction, and Planning offers an interdisciplinary opportunity to study for the profession through multiple fields including archeology, architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, interior design, building construction, museum studies, law, and cultural tourism.  The master’s degree course work is practical and technical in scope and includes the study of history, research techniques, traditional crafts, materials conservation, documentation, interpretation, cultural research management, housing, urban rejuvenation and adaptive use of historic structures, restoration methodologies, economics, green design and sustainable/livable communities.

The 21st century offers significant expansion of the field of heritage conservation to address smart growth, sustainability, and economic development initiatives. Many related jobs exist, including preservation consultant, preservation contractor, preservation researcher, Main Street program director, site manager, lawyer, archaeologist, cultural resource manager, historian, real estate professional, and policy administrator.

The College offers several nationally recognized field schools or practica: Preservation Institute: Nantucket, Traditional Crafts Field School, and the National Historic Landmarks District in Saint Augustine, America’s oldest city.

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation (ICCHP) integrates resources throughout UF to address the diverse topics relevant to the field. Thus, the ICCHP establishes a set of courses that allow graduate students to gain expertise in researching and applying historic preservation in the United States and abroad. Depending on the student’s career goals and background, this can include recognizing, documenting, and protecting historic structures and sites; rehabilitation and restoration technologies; and exploring emerging and related specializations such as community development and sustainable development.

The interdisciplinary curriculum structure draws on course work providing 12 credits for master’s students and 15 credits for Ph.D. students specializing in historic preservation. The concentration is officially recognized by statements on the transcript and by a certificate.

For more information, contact Morris Hylton, Director of Historic Preservation Programs. University of Florida, P.O. Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611. Phone (352)392-0252, ext. 457. E-mail mhylton@ufl.edu.

The University of Florida College of Design, Construction and Planning offers a Master of Historic Preservation degree using an interdisciplinary variety of coursework in the basic and applied skills and arts of historic preservation, anthropology, archeology, architecture, building construction, cultural tourism, history, interior design, landscape architecture, museum studies, and urban and regional planning. The coursework totals 42 hours. Students must take 12 hours of core courses, 6 hours of pre-approved history electives, and may choose from pre-approved and specially approved electives from across the campus. A true thesis to meet Graduate Requirements relating to historic preservation is required.

Program of Study

The Master of Historic Preservation degree program promotes interdisciplinary thinking in historic preservation by combining (1) required coursework in history and theory, research, documentation and recording historic sites, conservation of building materials and systems, and practica or other practical experience with (2) two courses in the history of the designed environment (including, for example architecture, urban development, landscape architecture, archeology, or material culture.) with (3) electives from a list of courses identified by the faculty, in the subject areas of resource-related studies including design issues, neighborhood issues (zoning, strategic planning, housing and social aspects of real estate development) historic and cultural landscape issues, historic interior issues, economic issues (marketing principles, private and public finance, property management and budget preparation), legal issues (Constitutional law, preservation case law, federal, state and local regulatory legislation and administration) sustainability issues traditional building crafts and curatorial issues (site development interpretation, management and cultural tourism). A true thesis that meets Graduate Requirements on an approved historic preservation topic is also required.

For more information contact:

For more information contact
Marty Hylton
Graduate Coordinator
mhylton@dcp.ufl.edu
352-392-0252 ext. 457

Pat DeJong
Student Affairs Coordinator
patricde@dcp.ufl.edu
352-392-4836 ext. 312
 

Hydrologic Sciences

Interdisciplinary graduate studies in hydrologic sciences are for science and engineering students seeking advanced training in diverse aspects of water quantity and quality, and water-use issues. This concentration emphasizes (1) understanding the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring over broad spatial and temporal scales; and (2) skills in hydrologic policy and management based on a strong background in natural and social sciences and engineering.

Graduate Faculty from nine departments in three colleges contribute to this interdisciplinary concentration. Depending on academic background and research interests, students may earn a degree in any one of the following departments: Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Civil and Coastal Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Horticultural Sciences, and Soil and Water Science.

M.S. (thesis and non-thesis option) and Ph.D. studies are available. Interdisciplinary graduate requirements recognize diversity in the academic backgrounds and professional goals of the students. A core curriculum (12 credits for M.S.; 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides broad training in five topics: hydrologic systems, hydrologic chemistry, hydrologic biology, hydrologic techniques and analysis, and hydrologic policy and management. Additional elective courses (11 to 14 credits for M.S.; 30 credits for Ph.D.) allow specialization in one or more of these topics. Research projects involving faculty from several academic units can provide the basis for thesis and dissertation research topics.

Assistantships supported by extramural grants are available. Tuition waivers may be available to students who qualify. Students with B.S. or M.S. degrees in any of the following disciplines are encouraged to consider this specialization in their graduate program: engineering (agricultural, chemical, civil, environmental); natural sciences (physics, biology, chemistry); social sciences (agricultural and resource economics); forestry; and earth sciences (geography, geology, soil and water science).

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Newman, UF Water Institute, P.O. Box 116601, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-5893, E-mail markn@ufl.edu; or visit the Hydrologic Sciences Academic Cluster website (http://www.hydrology.ufl.edu).  

Quantitative Finance

The interdisciplinary concentration in quantitative finance trains students for academic and research positions in quantitative finance, and risk management. It gives graduates an edge in the job market by providing substantial expertise in key related disciplines: finance, operations research, statistics, mathematics, and software development. It is focused in teaching and research on design, development, and implementing new financial and risk management products, processes, strategies, and systems to meet demands of various institutions, corporations, governments, and households. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary approach requiring knowledge in finance, economics, mathematics, probability/statistics, operations research, engineering, and computer science.

Four academic units participate in this interdisciplinary concentration: Industrial and Systems Engineering (College of Engineering), Mathematics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), Statistics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate (College of Business Administration). To be eligible, a student must be admitted to a Ph.D. program in one of these participating academic units. Students seeking admission to the concentration need strong quantitative skills and a degree in one of the relevant fields such as finance, engineering, statistics, or mathematics. Students with a background in several disciplines are welcome. Application should be submitted to one of the participating academic units.

Each student takes basic courses and meets the home academic unit’s Ph.D. requirements. The student also takes approved courses in the other participating academic units to meet the requirements of the concentration.

Dissertation research is conducted in quantitative finance, risk management, and relevant areas involving quantitative finance approaches. The student receives a Ph.D. degree and a Certificate in Quantitative Finance.

Activities of the Ph.D. concentration in quantitative finance are supported by the Risk Management and Financial Engineering Laboratory (RMFE Lab), http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe. The RMFE Lab facilitates research and applications in the area of risk management and financial mathematics/engineering, including organizing research meetings, seminars, and conferences. It provides a basis for the collaborative efforts of multidisciplinary teams of UF researchers, governmental institutions, and industrial partners.

Sustainable Architecture

The Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Architecture is for architecture graduate students (in the M.Arch. or M.S.A.S. program) seeking advanced courses on a wide range of topics related to sustainable architecture. The concentration in sustainable architecture supports detailed rigorous study in specific areas of expertise. Furthermore, the program requirements recognize the inherent diversity of academic backgrounds and professional goals of the students. Thus, there is flexibility in the selection of a suite of courses, while maintaining exposure to the multidisciplinary subject matter of sustainable architecture. This essential feature of the program allows students to develop individualized yet focused plans of study. Students select from a variety of approved courses offered in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning (the School of Architecture, the School of Building Construction, the Department of Interior Design, the Department of Landscape Architecture, and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning); and in other colleges in the University. Course work may include the following sustainability issues.

  • Architectural design and preventing environmental degradation: protecting ecosystems, fauna and flora, energy consumption, energy conservation, architectural commissioning, maintenance, water consumption, land use, and materials selection (resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)
  • Providing healthy architectural environments: indoor air environmental quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and landscapes
  • Responsive and responsible building design and construction: environmentally responsive architecture, and environmentally responsible architecture
  • Sustainable architectural and environment theory: the philosophy of sustainable design, ecological theory, sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and systems theory
  • Enhancing the community environment: historic preservation, sustainable developments, community and neighborhood design, regional design, and systems theory
  • Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction, and reconstruction.

Students enrolled in the Concentration and Certificate Program in Sustainable Architecture must complete at least 12 credits of approved sustainable architecture electives. Students must complete at least 6 credits within the School of Architecture; and at least one approved 3 credit course from outside the School of Architecture. Students also must complete a research project or thesis on a subject pre-approved by the concentration’s Governing Board, related to sustainable architecture. For more information, contact the Graduate Program Assistant, School of Architecture, University of Florida, Box 115702, Gainesville FL 32611-5702, Phone (352) 392-0205 ext. 202, E-mail bhuds@ufl.edu

Sustainable Design

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Design (ICCSD) is for master’s-level students in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning. This concentration allows students to become proficient in one or more of the following areas: sustainable architecture, sustainable construction, sustainable interior design, sustainable landscape architecture, or sustainable urban planning. Course work deals with the following issues.

  • Preventing environmental degradation: protecting ecosystems, fauna and flora, energy conservation, energy consumption, architectural commissioning, maintenance, water consumption, land use, site selection, and materials selection (resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)
  • Providing healthy environments: indoor air environmental quality, outdoor environmental quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and landscapes
  • Responsive and responsible building construction: construction impacts on sites, environmentally responsive architecture, environmentally responsible architecture (preventing environmental degradation), and designing sustainable building components
  • Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction, reconstruction, and historic preservation
  • Enhancing the community environment: sustainable developments, community and neighborhood design, regional design, and city planning design
  • Environmental theory: the philosophy of sustainable design, ecological theory, sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and systems theory.

Students wishing to participate in the ICCSD should notify their department or school as early in the graduate program as possible. To participate in the ICCSD, a student must be admitted and enrolled in one of the departments participating in the ICCSD. Students will complete the concentration for either the master’s degree or Master of Science degree, but not for both degrees if awarded from the University of Florida. Students cannot enroll in two concentration programs at the same time.

To successfully complete the ICCSD, the student must earn 12 credit hours in sustainable design research and course work from a list of recommended courses. To satisfy the interdisciplinary intent of the ICCSD, the student must take one of the approved 3 credit courses outside their home department or school, but within the College of Design, Construction, and Planning; and at least one approved 3 credit course from another college of the University. For more information, contact the Dean’s Office in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, University of Florida, Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, Telephone (352) 392-4836.  

Tropical Conservation and Development

The Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), in the Center for Latin American Studies, offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate and graduate concentration focused on integrative approaches to conservation and development in the tropics, including sub-tropical and temperate areas in developing countries. Both the certificate and concentration are open to students who are interested in acquiring interdisciplinary knowledge and technical skills to pursue a career in conservation and development research and practice. These students must be enrolled in master’s or Ph.D. programs in TCD’s affiliate academic units at the University of Florida.

Course work for the certificate and the concentration includes social science theory, principles of tropical ecology, and patterns and trends of tropical resource use and conservation. TCD core courses also allow students to gain essential practical skills. Emphasis is on communication and presentation techniques, grant writing, proposal writing, and fundraising; facilitation and conflict management; participatory methods for research and project implementation; and project design, analysis, and evaluation. Summer research, practitioner experiences, and field-based training programs provide learning opportunities outside the classroom.

On completing the certificate or concentration, students should have an in-depth understanding of the relationships among biological conservation, resource management, and the livelihood needs of rural communities; and the appropriate professional skills for a career in research, field practice, or both.

TCD’s affiliate academic units are African Studies, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Agricultural Education and Communication, Agronomy, Anthropology, Architecture, Biology, Comparative Law, Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geology, Latin American Studies, Natural History Museum, Natural Resources and Environment, Plant Medicine, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Soil and Water Science, Tourism, Recreation and Sports Management, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, and Women’s Studies.

Master’s students can earn a certificate in TCD by completing 12 credits of approved course work: 2 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical ecology and social science. Ph.D. students can earn a certificate by completing 15 credits of approved course work (3 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical ecology and social science). Students from natural science academic units must take the social science credits outside their major. Otherwise, courses from the student’s major can count toward program requirements. Substitutions need prior approval from the TCD faculty adviser.

To earn a concentration in TCD, students must complete the course requirements for the certificate (as explained above) and they must focus on conservation and development in their thesis, dissertation, or final project. One member of the student’s supervisory committee must be a TCD affiliate faculty member. This person is responsible for judging whether the student’s thesis focuses on tropical conservation and/or development. For the faculty member to make this judgment, the student must articulate in writing how the research fits in the broader context of biodiversity conservation and/or rural development in the tropics, subtropics, or temperate areas in developing countries. This person cannot count as the external member of the committee.

For more information on the TCD certificate and concentration program, and for a list of approved courses, visit the TCD website (http://www.ufl.edu), or contact Bette Loiselle, TCD Director, 347 Grinter Hall, (352) 273-4706, E-mail Loiselle@latam.ufl.edu or Patricia Sampaio, TCD Program Coordinator, 343 Grinter Hall, (352) 273-4734, Email PSampaio@latam.ufl.edu.

Wetland Sciences

The Interdisciplinary Concentration in Wetland Sciences (ICWS) is a unified interdisciplinary program in wetland science and policy for master’s and doctoral students.

Graduate faculty from the following academic units contribute to the wetlands sciences concentration: Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Botany, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Landscape Architecture, Law, Soil and Water Sciences, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, and Zoology. Students in any of these programs may elect to participate in the ICWS. A major strength of the ICWS is the breadth of wetlands-related courses and research opportunities in many academic programs across campus. The ICWS exposes students to perspectives outside their disciplines and provides a rigorous, substantive education in wetlands sciences in addition to their disciplinary focus.

Students may complete the ICWS for either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. A core curriculum (15 credits for M.S. and 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides the opportunity for interdisciplinary training in four broad subject areas:

  • wetlands science (1 course each in wetlands ecology, wetland hydrology, and wetlands biogeochemistry),
  • wetlands systems,
  • wetlands organisms, and
  • wetlands policy/law.

Additional course work in a student’s disciplinary focus may strengthen the student’s knowledge base or allow for specialization in one or more of the areas.

For more information, contact Dr. Mark T. Brown, Director, Howard T. Odum Center for Wetlands, Phelps Lab, P.O. Box 116350, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-2424; or visit the website (http://www.cfw.ufl.edu).   

Women’s and Gender Studies

Two certificates, one master’s degree (thesis or non-thesis option), and a doctoral concentration are offered in women’s and gender studies. Participating graduate faculty are from several academic units, campus-wide, including Agricultural and Life Sciences, Anthropology, Counselor Education, English, German and Slavic Studies, History, Journalism and Communications, Latin American Studies, Linguistics, Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology, and Teaching and Learning.

The two graduate certificates in women’s studies for master’s and doctoral students are offered in conjunction with degree programs in other academic units. The Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and Development require specific sets of course work to thoroughly ground students in the discipline. The Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies is a general introduction to the field, and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and Development allows students to focus on issues related to gender, economic development, and globalization.

The doctoral interdisciplinary concentrations in women’s and gender studies give graduate students a thorough grounding in the new scholarship produced by the intersection of women’s studies and other academic fields. The concentration facilitates analysis and assessment of theories about the role of gender in cultural systems and its intersections with other categories of differences, such as race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, physical and mental ability, age, and economic and civil status. Emphasis is on participating in women’s and gender studies research and on providing an intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines. Women’s and gender studies critically explores the role and status of women and men, past and present.

Participating academic units award Ph.D. degrees with an interdisciplinary concentration in women’s and gender studies. Study plans are designed by each student’s supervisory committee, whose chair is affiliated with women’s and gender studies.

Admission requirements are those of the student’s home academic unit and college. After admission to the degree-granting academic unit, the application is sent to the Graduate Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies who chairs an admissions committee.

For more information on the master’s degree, contact the Director, Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, 3324 Turlington Hall.

+Programs are the students’ primary fields of study; a program is the student’s major. The degree and program name appear on the student’s transcript.  Concentrations are subprograms within a major. The concentration, degree, and program may appear on the student transcript.  Specializations are informal designations, used by academic units, to indicate areas of research or scholarly strength, and have no formal significance. Tracks and emphases are similar unofficial terms. No tracks, emphases, or specializations appear in official lists in this catalog or on the student transcript.